Types of transitions include Internal previews or forecasts that allow the

Types of transitions include internal previews or

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Types of transitions include: Internal previews or forecasts that allow the listener to know what the speaker will cover next. Internal summaries that briefly summarize the speaker's preceding points. Signposts that link words or phrases that move the audience from one idea to another. PREPARE AN OUTLINE Proofread & Revise Great writing is revised many times before it becomes final. One of the keys to an effective revision is setting your draft aside for a while. Take a break between writing and proofreading. A good technique to proofread is to read the text out loud. One recommended sequence for proofreading is: Check format: Is it formatted correctly? Are any of the required parts missing or incomplete? Check for grammatical errors: Improper punctuation, misspelled words, run-on sentences.
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Read for content: Are my ideas clearly stated and written in a logical order? Is there enough material to fill the time allowed to speak? PREPARE SPEAKER NOTES Once you have completed your presentation outline, prepare speaker notes to use during rehearsals and the actual delivery of your presentation. Prepare the speaker notes on note cards—rather than paper. Speaker notes use key words or phrases to jog your memory when you deliver the presentation. Follow these guidelines as you prepare speaker notes: Use key words or phrases: A word or two should be enough to trigger your memory, especially if you've practiced adequately. Fully write/type out the ideas that must be stated precisely: You don't want to make mistakes with people's names, statistics, or exact quotations. Give direction: Include directions for delivery, such as "SHOW GRAPH." Add emphasis to easily catch your eye, show the relationship of ideas, and jog your memory during delivery: You might use capital letters, white spaces, underlining, indentation, dashes, and highlighting to emphasize important ideas REHEARSE THE PRESENTATION Reasons for Rehearsing Once your outline and speaker notes are prepared, you are ready to rehearse. The key to successful delivery is practice. The two reasons for extensive rehearsal are: To become familiar with the presentation material To be comfortable with your communication skills The benefits of rehearsing for a presentation include: It will reveal the most effective wording to ensure a smooth flow of the presentation. It allows the speaker to be familiar with the main points and reduces the need to refer to speaker notes. It allows the speaker to identify areas that are not in logical order and helps find awkward transitions. It allows the speaker to test the timing of the presentation, thus keeping within the time limit. The indicators of effective rehearsal include a presentation that flows smoothly and a speaker that appears knowledgeable, comfortable, and remains within the time limit.
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