These affairs occur because of less satisfaction in

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The Psychology of Women
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 01
The Psychology of Women
Matlin
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These affairs occur because of less satisfaction in marriages and midlife changes, as noted below (Laumann et al., 1994). As social norms and laws have changed, infidelity has apparently increased, and the effect seems to have increased the dissolution of mar- riages, with greater numbers of divorce in the United States. Divorce and Subsequent Marriages Divorce, the legal termination of a marriage, has become more common in our society over past generations. There are actually several different kinds of divorce that vary by the laws of each country. Divorce is widely perceived to have increased in Western Europe and the United States, though since 1980, it has decreased. The current divorce rate is 17.7 per 1,000 married women, down from 22.6 in 1980. About 3.5 divorces occur for every 1,000 people today, according to the latest census (Kreider & Ellis, 2011). The increase in cohabitation, resulting in fewer marriages among young adults, may have contributed to the decline in divorce rate over about 30 years. By comparison, one in three marriages ends in divorce in the United Kingdom and Australia.
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The Psychology of Women
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Chapter 7 / Exercise 01
The Psychology of Women
Matlin
Expert Verified
Sexuality in Adulthood and Later Life Divorcing can be a huge shock for some people and may include depression for some and relief for others. The most common reason people divorce is problems in communi- cation or a sense of feeling unhappy or unloved in a relationship (Defrain & Olson, 1999; Pere!, 2006). Some couples cite "incompatibility," which may refer to psychological and emotional differences that result from any number of things, including sex, money, and children (Defrain & Olson, 1999). Younger people are more likely to divorce than older people, which is why some people recommend delaying marriage until later in life. People with less education and less income, as well as women who attain graduate degrees and career success, have higher rates of divorce. Additionally, the so-called "4-year" or "7-year" itch is not just a myth but refers to higher divorce rates around these milestones in the cycle of marriage and commitment-which may suggest a gradual awakening to the level of dissatisfaction with one's partner. Adding to the stress of divorce on the partners is concern about the effects of the breakup on their children. The effect of divorce or separation on children has been widely studied (Gortman, 2011). The older and more emotionally stable the children are, the better they adjust. At whatever age, though, divorce is disruptive and chil- dren may have many reactions, including anger, depression, sadness, and grief. Boys and girls differ somewhat in their reactions to the divorce of their parents. Strong emotional support, communication, and parents keeping clear boundaries by respect- ing the roles of being mother and father no matter what happens in the divorce, are important to help the children and family cope with divorce (Gortman, 2011; Pere!, 2006). For example, allowing visitation rights to both parents after divorce, assuming that there are no other issues involved, recognizes the roles of each parent in the lives of their children.

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