IEC_Elctrical Energy Storage.pdf

Smoothing out for wind and pv energy mwh class the

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Smoothing out for wind (and PV) energy (MWh class) The Japan Wind Development Co. Ltd. has constructed a wind power generation facility equipped with a battery in Aomori, Japan (Futamata wind power plant, shown in Figures 3-9 and 3-10). This facility consists of 51 MW of wind turbines (1 500 kW x 34 units) and 34 MW of NaS batteries (2 000 kW x 17 units). By using the NaS battery, the total power output of this facility is smoothed and peak output is controlled to be no greater than 40 MW. Operation started in June 2008.
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50 S E C T I O N 3 Markets for EES Wind turbines NaS battery units PCS building Administration/control building Interconnected power transformation unit Figure 3-9 – General view of the Futamata wind power plant (Japan Wind Development Co.) Figure 3-10 – NaS battery units – 34 MW (Japan Wind Development Co.)
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51 Figure 3-11 shows an example of output from this facility. The electric power sales plan is predetermined one day before. In order to achieve this plan, the NaS battery system controls charging or discharging in accordance with the output of wind power generation. This facility meets the technical requirements of the local utility company to connect to the grid. 3.2.2 Smart Grid Today’s grids are generally based on large central power plants connected to high-voltage transmission systems that supply power to medium and low-voltage distribution systems. The power flow is in one direction only: from the power stations, via the transmission and distribution grid, to the final consumers. Dispatching of power and network control is Figure 3-11 – Example operational results of constant output control over 8 hours (NGK) typically conducted by centralized facilities and there is little or no consumer participation. For the future distribution system, grids will become more active and will have to accommodate bi-directional power flows and an increasing transmission of information. Some of the electricity generated by large conventional plants will be displaced by the integration of renewable energy sources. An increasing number of PV, biomass and on-shore wind generators will feed into the medium and low- voltage grid. Conventional electricity systems must be transformed in the framework of a market model in which generation is dispatched according to market forces and the grid control centre undertakes an overall supervisory role (active power balancing and ancillary services such as voltage control). Wind Power 50,000 40,000 30,000 -30,000 (23-Oct) 17:00 18:00 19:00 20:00 21:00 22:00 23:00 20,000 -20,000 10,000 -10,000 Power (kW) 0 Data Interval: 1 sec Total Power NAS Power
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52 S E C T I O N 3 Markets for EES The Smart Grid concept (Figure 3-12) is proposed as one of the measures to solve problems in such a system. The Smart Grid is expected to control the demand side as well as the generation side, so that the overall power system can be more efficiently and rationally operated. The Smart Grid includes many technologies such as IT and communications, control technologies and EES.
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