This is a warning to tourvel as her affair progresses

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be happy. This is a warning to Tourvel as her affair progresses with the Vicomte de Valmont. Despite the seemingly unique way in which they became lovers, there are certain characteristics of the two sexes that remain. 6. ...pleasure, which is undeniably the sole motive force behind the union of the sexes, is nevertheless not enough to form a bond between them...even if it is preceded by desire which impels, it is succeeded by disgust which repels. This is a law of nature which only love can change. [Le plaisir, qui est bien en effet l'unique mobile de la réunion des deux sexes, ne suffit pourtant pas pour former une liaison entre eux..., s'il est précédé du désir qui rapproche, il n'est pas moins suivi du dégoût qui repousse. C'est une loi de la nature, que l'amour seul peut changer.] Explanation for Quotation 6 >> In Letter One Hundred and Thirty-one, the Marquise de Merteuil writes to the Vicomte de Valmont to ask him to give up their plan for a reunion, since they cannot ever be honest to each other or happy together. But even though this is a kind of break-up letter from the Marquise, she makes an unusual show of optimism about relationships along the way. Judging from the majority of the Marquise's actions, one would assume that the only thing in life she is interested in is pleasure. However, this quotation shows that she believes that love exists, and that she believes that love is the one force that can grant a permanent truce between the embattled sexes.
4. Notes from the Underground Man Key Facts full title · Notes from Underground or Zapiski iz podpol’ya author · Fyodor Dostoevsky type of work · Novel genre · Satire; social critique; fictional memoir; existential novel; psychological study language · Russian time and place written · 1863; St. Petersburg date of first publication · January–April 1864 publisher · Epoch magazine narrator · The anonymous narrator of Notes from Underground is also the novel’s protagonist. The Underground Man is a bitter, reclusive forty-year-old civil servant speaking from his St. Petersburg apartment in the 1860s, though he spends the second section of the novel describing his life as a younger man in the 1840s. point of view · The narrator speaks in the first person, describing his own thoughts and feelings and narrating events that occurred sixteen years earlier in his life. tone · The Underground Man is a prime example of an unreliable narrator. Because the whole novel is told through his skewed and irrational perspective, we cannot take his depictions of events and characters at face value. We also cannot assume that the Underground Man’s perspective is the same as Dostoevsky’s. The author maintains a considerable distance between his view and the narrator’s. Often, we see Dostoevsky satirizing an event that the Underground Man sees as very serious.

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