The final part of this experiment was done for repetitive grip strength Refer

The final part of this experiment was done for

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to Figure 5 for visual representation. The final part of this experiment was done for repetitive grip strength. Refer to Table 8 for data. Table 8- Repetitive Grip Strength Grip Strength Data EMG Data Time Interval Mean Grip Strength (N) Max (mV) Min (mV) mv Figure 5: This figure shows the correlation between continuous grip strength with visual grip strength and EMG data. The force is 0.0 N and the potential is 0.567 mV.
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0-20 s 74.7 2.55 -0.96 3.54 60-80 s 40.5 1.73 -0.95 2.68 80-100 s 44.0 1.98 -0.96 2.94 Compared to tables 6 and 7, the numbers in this test were notably smaller. The subject had to repeatedly grip and let go of the sensor for a duration of 80 seconds. From 0 seconds to 80 the mean grip strength lowered, but when the individual was told to grip harder, the grip strength only went up by a small amount. The EMG data shows that at first the maximum mV lowered, and then for the last 20 seconds the number increased. For the minimum mV, there was a slight fluctuation which that decreased by 1 and the went up again. The mv, like the maximum mV, also went down and then came back up. Refer to Figure 6 for visual representation. Discussion Grip Strength Data In the first part of the experiment where the grip strength of dominant hands was being tested, the results showed that there is a difference in grip strength in the dominant and non- dominant hand. It would make sense for the dominant hand of an individual to have more of a grip strength than the non-dominant hand. People who use their dominant hand, overall, have more grip strength in that hand than their non-dominant hand. In addition, there appears to be a Figure 6: This figure shows the correlation between continuous grip strength with visual grip strength and EMG data. The force is 1.0 N and the potential is -0.960 mV.
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correlation between handedness and grip strength according to Table 4. People who are right- handed have a stronger grip strength on their right hand than on their left hands. This is the same for left-handed people: their left hand has more of a grip strength than their right hand. Another trend that was seen in this experiment was the correlation between height and grip strength. It is noticeable that as the height of an individual increases, the grip strength average also increases. By this it can be said that the taller the person is, the more grip strength they have. Biological sex plays a more significant role in grip strength than in height and handedness. According to the results, males have more of a grip strength than woman which is often how it is depicted by the society. Not only does grip strength in hands, but it is also in fingers. The pinch strength showed differences in the grip strength of each finger. Gradually, as the data shows in Table 2, the grip strength of each finger went down. The largest difference is seen between the index finger and the little finger. This shows that the index finger has the strongest grip strength while the pinky has the weakest. There are two possible reasons for the differences that are seen in the pinch strength of the first two fingers and the second two fingers. One possible reason is that the radial muscle can be larger than the ulnar muscle which causes the index and middle finger to be stronger. Another reason could be that most of the times, people use their thumb, index, and middle fingers more than the ring and little finger; because of this the first three fingers have more strength than the last two.
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  • Winter '18
  • Scott Nichols
  • Left-handedness, Handedness

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