212 Part 2 Designing Training passion to learn and an active lifestyle All of

212 part 2 designing training passion to learn and an

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212 Part 2 Designing Training passion to learn, and an active lifestyle. All of Patagonia’s human resource management practices, including training and development, support the company’s mission. For example, the company hires “dirtbags”––passionate outdoor people who are customers. Patagonia believes that it is easier to teach these people business than it is to turn a busi- ness salesperson into someone with a passion for the outdoors. Patagonia hires primarily from within its current work force. Employee education is emphasized as much as product research and promotion. Patagonia provides employees with a minimum of 45 hours of training per year. The wide range of classes offered are designed to keep employees learning but are not necessarily related to employees’ current jobs. These courses include an introduction to French culture, business and communications, Japanese style, and beginning sewing. Patagonia also has an internship program that allows employees to take time off from work. How do Patagonia’s practices contribute to creat- ing a positive climate for learning and transfer of training? Source: Based on J. Laabs, “Mixing Business with Passion,” Workforce (March 2000): 80–87. Also, see Patagonia’s Web site at www .patagonia.com . Endnotes 1. J. Zenger, J. Folkman, and R. Sherwin, “Phase 3,” T D (January 2005): 30–35; L. Burke and H. Hutchins, “Training Transfer: An Integrative Review,” Human Resource Development Review 6 (2007): 263–296. 2. M. L. Broad and J. W. Newstrom, Transfer of Training (Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley, 1992). 3. A. Saks and M. Belcourt, “An Investigation of Training Activities and Transfer of Training in Organiza- tions,” Human Resource Management 45 (2006): 629–648. 4. J. M. Royer, “Theories of the Transfer of Learning,” Educational Psychologist 14 (1979): 53–69. 5. E. L. Thorndike and R. S. Woodworth, “The Influence of Improvement of One Mental Function upon the Efficiency of Other Functions,” Psychological Review 8 (1901): 247–61. 6. J. F. Reintzell, “When Training Saves Lives,” Training and Development 51 (1997): 41–42. 7. J. A. Sparrow, “The Measurement of Job Profile Similarity for the Prediction of Transfer of Learning,” Journal of Occupational Psychology 62 (1989): 337–41. 8. M. Machin, “Planning, Managing, and Optimizing Transfer of Training,” in Creating, Implementing, and Managing Effective Training and Development, ed. K.Kraiger (San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 2002): 263–301; J.Kim and C.Lee, “Implications of Near and Far Transfer of Training on Structured On-the-Job Training,” Advances in Developing Human Resources (November 2001): 442–51; S. L. Yelon and J. K. Ford, “Pursuing a Multidimensional View of Transfer,” Performance Improvement Quarterly 12 (1999): 58–78. 9. Ibid. 10. J. Barbazette, Managing the Training Function for Bottom Line Results (San Francisco: Pfeiffer, 2008). 11. C. A. Frayne and J. M. Geringer, “Self-Management Training for Joint Venture General Managers,” Human Resource Planning 15 (1993): 69–85; L. Burke and T. Baldwin, “Workforce Training Transfer: A Study of the Effect of Relapse Prevention Training and Transfer Climate,” Human Resource Management (Fall 1999): 227–42; C. Frayne and J. Geringer, “Self-Management Training for Improving Job Performance: A Field
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