Mexican worker Niagara on the Lake September 2008 While Preibisch and Otero

Mexican worker niagara on the lake september 2008

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Mexican worker, Niagara-on-the-Lake, September 2008. While Preibisch and Otero ( 2014 ), in their comparison of workplace health and safety for immigrant and migrant farm workers, found that immigrants also concealed illnesses from their employers and labour contractors out of fear of losing their employment, they argue that migrants face unique vulnerabilities. While immigrants with partial or full formal citizenship may face barriers finding employment outside agriculture, they have the legal right to do so and the eligibility for government-funded language classes that can improve their labour market attachment. In further distinction from migrants in state-managed labour programmes, immigrants can rely on their family members physically located in Canada and, for those landed for more than 10 years, gain access to welfare. In addition to fears in reporting illnesses, migrant farm workers also face barriers to receiving adequate care, including long hours of work coupled with limited knowledge of the health care system. They lack independent transportation to clinics and once there are often faced with long wait times, language barriers and cultural issues. Migrants described some of their experiences accessing health care in the following ways: I got an infection. When I went to the hospital I encountered translation problems because the person that went with me left me alone in the hospital before getting the medical attention. It was embarrasing. Mexican worker, Bradford, June 2008. I had a bladder infection and told the supervisor, but he would not take me to the doctor. I had to ride my bike 4 km after work in the evening. Jamaican worker, Niagara-on-the-Lake, November 2008. J. Hennebry et al.
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Health care mediation by employers emerged as a noteworthy theme throughout the study. Not only do employers mediate migrants access to care by providing transpor- tation, translation, and access to private insurance (in the case of the S-LSO), they also are responsible for taking them to apply for provincial health cards required by the Ontario Health Insurance Program (OHIP). In fact, we found that despite having legal access to an OHIP card (which beneficiaries are encouraged to carry at all times and required to prove entitlement to health care services), nearly a fifth of our survey respondents (19 %) claimed not to have the card. Without an OHIP card in their possession, other barriers are compounded as migrants must also depend on the employer to mediate access to the card. As one worker puts it, [I didn t access health care because] a person who drove over my foot did not want to get in trouble. Also, I did not have a health card. Jamaican worker in Niagara-on-the-Lake, September 2008. As previously mentioned, unlike Canadian permanent residents or citizens, migrants are dependent on employers to obtain their health cards. This additional barrier emerges directly from their liminality.
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