To pursue happiness in his or her own way and because

This preview shows page 9 - 10 out of 14 pages.

to pursue happiness in his or her own way, and because the versions of happiness individuals  pursue are inevitably mutually incompatible (I wish to have prayer in schools, you do not; I wish  to outlaw abortion, which you support; I wish to raise taxes on the wealthy to feed the poor,  which you reject), and because we cannot persuade one another or agree on a common good,  politics is, as MacIntyre says, “civil war carried on by other means” ( After Virtue  253). MacIntyre calls this point of view  emotivism , “the doctrine that all evaluative judgments  and more specifically all moral judgments are  nothing but  expressions of preference, expressions  of attitude or feeling, insofar as they are moral or evaluative in character” ( After Virtue  11-12,  emphasis in original). In a world where people subscribe to emotivism, moral judgments, since  they cannot be used for reasoned persuasion, are used for two reasons: to express our own  preferences, and to try to change the emotions and attitudes of those with whom we disagree in  order to make them agree with us and share our preferences. MacIntyre believes that emotivism  is a false doctrine, because we can in fact rationally determine the best possible life for human  beings and therefore can have moral judgments that are more than mere preferences, but it is  nevertheless a doctrine that many people today subscribe to, and they act as though it is true.  MacIntyre says that “the key to the social content of emotivism….is the fact that emotivism  entails the obliteration of any genuine distinction between manipulative and non-manipulative  social relations” ( After Virtue  23). Each of us regards the other members of our society as means  to ends of our own. Because I cannot persuade people, and because we cannot have any common good that is not purely temporary and based on our separate individual desires, there is no kind  of social relationship left except for each of us trying to use the others to achieve our own selfish  goals.  Dworkin Dworkin, for example, claims justice is the essential motif of liberalism and that the state’s duty  is to ensure a just and fair opportunity for all to compete and flourish in a civil society. That may  require active state intervention in some areas – areas that classical liberals would reject as being inadmissible in a free economy. Dworkin’s position emanates from  Aristotle ’s ethical argument that for a person to pursue the good life he requires a certain standard of living. Poverty is not 

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture