Courts have power to force compliance but question of application of

Courts have power to force compliance but question of

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Courts have power to force compliance, but question of application of international law decisions Still influential on domestic law, however International Courts: An Overview Trial courts inquisitional in most countries
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Judicial independence Structure Appointments and tenure Specific Example: Canada Very similar to US -Common law tradition -Federal system -Supreme Court controls docket -Appointments to federal courts However, key differences -Provincial court appointments -Legislative veto -Heavier reliance on foreign law Specific Example: Nigeria New democracy, new judicial independence (Semi-) unitary court system Interesting mix of law and customs Struggling to make its mark Final Thoughts Judiciary matters Judiciary classes Those below: you will probably hate them Brown teaches them POLS 431 (Constitutional Law: Criminal Justice) POLS442 (Administrative Law and Regulatory Policymaking) 4-26-18 FINAL EXAM NOTES: Monism is the theory of law that international law should be a factor in domestic cases in other words under monist theory international law should be just as much a part of the legal system as the Dualism; domestic law should trump international treaties and laws Voir dire- jury selection process when lawyer come in and interrogates jurors to decide which will serve on the jury .
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Stare decisis- “let the decision stand”, theory judges should almost always referto precedent (just need to know the definition)
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  • Fall '11
  • SAMUELNAILING
  • Political Science, Supreme Court of the United States, Early Court

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