Northerners favored giving Congress broad powers to control trade Southerners

Northerners favored giving congress broad powers to

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-Northerners favored giving Congress broad powers to control trade. Southerners worried that Congress might outlaw the slave trade and place heavy taxes on southern exports ofcrops, such as cotton and tobaccoCreating the Executive Branch: One Head or Many-Some delegates wanted a single executive to head the government-Others were concerned that giving power to a single leader might give rise to a monarchyor tyranny-They finally decided to set up a special body called the Electoral College-Electoral College: a body of electors from each state who cast votes to elect the president and vice president3.5 Ratifying the Constitution KL-The Constitution included a provision for ratification. To go into effect, the new plan of government would need to be ratified by at least 9 of the 13 states.-The pro-ratification effort was led by supporters of the Constitution who called themselves Federalists. They favored the creation of a strong federal government that shared power with the states.-Their opponents were known as Anti-Federalists. These were people who preferred the loose association of states established under the Articles of Confederation. Anti-Federalist Speaks out Against Constitution
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Kailey Lyson4th hour- worried about the increased powers of taxation granted to the national government. Others wereconcerned that the government would create a large standing army or that a federal court system would overrule state courts.- two chief complaints about the proposed Constitution. The first was, as Virginia delegate, George Mason, pointed out, “There is no Declaration of Rights,” or a bill of rights. The second was that the Constitution would make the national government too powerful. Mason worried that “the laws of the general government” would be “paramount to the laws and constitutions of the several states.”-The Anti-Federalists feared that a strong national government would lead to tyranny. -They believed that the states, being smaller, were more able to represent the people's rights and preserve democracy. For that reason, they argued that the states, not the national government, should hold most of the power.-Anti-Federalist camp initially included some of the leading figures of the American Revolution, including Samuel Adams, Patrick Henry, and John Hancock. In their minds, the Constitution represented abetrayal of the democratic ideals that had motivated the American Revolution.Federalist Defend the Constitution-Federalists mounted a spirited defense of the Constitution.Three men led this campaign: Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay. Hamilton and Madison had helped frame theConstitution. -these men wrote a series of 85 essays known as The Federalist Papers. These essays were published over the course of several months and made a strong case for the new plan of government. Some historians have called the publication of these papers one of the most powerful public relations campaigns in history.
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