These are not true allergies of the medication and should not be placed on the

These are not true allergies of the medication and

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vomiting or a warm feeling. These are not true allergies of the medication and should not be placed on the allergy list. Instead, nurses and providers can inform the patient that if they do not want the mediation again then they can alert the provider instead of classifying it as an allergy. This also decreases the risk of alert fatigue when it refers to multiple allergy warnings. I also feel like your case scenario portrays an excellent display of how the CDSS is appropriately used. Krista Longmore Reference
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Légat, L., Van Laere, S., Nyssen, M., Steurbaut, S., Dupont, A. G., & Cornu, P. (2018). Clinical Decision Support Systems for Drug Allergy Checking: Systematic Review. Journal Of Medical Internet Research , 20 (9), e258. - org.chamberlainuniversity.idm.oclc.org/10.2196/jmir.8206 Hello Professor Clemons, There are other things that providers can use to assist them in preventing drug-drug interactions. One of these system checks that was started to promote patient safety is computerized physician order entry (CPOE). Computerized physician order entry has been supported as an essential factor of patient safety, quality improvement, and transformation of medical practice (Khanna & Yen, 2014). This system also allows providers to use order sets, which also helps decrease interactions of medications. The pharmacy also verifies the patient's medications prior to administration to ensure safety. Physicians and providers can also look up the medications individually if unfamiliar with a specific mediation they are prescribing. Another system that is used at my hospital is clinical pharmacology. This is a link in the system that providers can use to check if medications are compatible, incompatible, or if there is no information documented on whether or not there is an interaction between the medications. Many factors need to be considered such as patient allergies and updated research. If a patient has several allergies they are more likely to have issues with interactions of medications. Furthermore, these systems do show proof of reducing medication errors and interactions. However, there is still nothing that gives a result of zero errors made. One study discovered that CPOE actually produced errors varying from incorrect dosing to duplication (Khanna & Yen, 2014). The reality is the provide is still human and can make errors in typing and calculating and often result in failed computer systems that cannot detect the error. Krista Longmore Khanna, R., & Yen, T. (2014). Computerized Physician Order Entry. The Neurohospitalist , 4 (1), 26-33. doi: 10.1177/1941874413495701
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