Horizontal anchors in addition to dividing a page

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Horizontal anchors: In addition to dividing a page into vertical columns, designers can establish a grid
horizontally. A horizontal anchor helps divide information into horizontal zones. This invisible anchor is often used to separate images and illustrations from the body text of the layout. Modular grids: Swiss graphic designers devised the modular grid system in the 1950s and 1960s. A modular grid has consistent horizontal divisions from the top of the page to the bottom. It is also divided equally with vertical divisions from left to right. These modules guide the designer in the placement of design elements within the spread.
What is the Right Grid to Use? There are no definitive rules for what kind of grid should be used for a design project, but one particular grid structure may prove more suitable than another in achieving certain content and design objectives. While you as a designer are staring at a blank page and a deadline, here are some “thinking points” that will help you decide on the optimal choice of grid structure. Page Elements: Is the publication text heavy or graphically heavy, or both? Are there many headlines, rules, illustrations and pull-quotes? Analyze the Text: A designer should analyze both the amount of text and how it is broken down. Is the text in one continuous block? Is the text divided, as in articles? Are there a few long
articles, lots of short articles, or a combination of long and short articles? Photos and Illustrations: Are there similarities in the types of illustrations or sizes of photos? Can photos be grouped by size or type? Are there a lot of rectangular elements or many irregularly shaped elements? Complexity: Once you’ve analyzed the content in this manner, a good rule of thumb to follow when making your grid decisions, is that in general, the more complex the grid is, the more design options available. On the other hand, a grid with too many options can destroy the underlying unity and organization that a grid provides. Variations on Grid Systems: Some designers mix grids when creating publications. Magazines, for instance, usually contain more than one kind of grid to accommodate different content elements which appear in the various sections of the publication. It is also okay to mix grid systems on the same page. For example, a page may be structured to contain a two-column grid on the top half to accommodate text, and a four- column grid on the bottom half of the page to make more effective spatial use for a series of images. The Golden Section: The golden section is a mathematical formula found throughout nature that has been used in Western art and architecture in the attempt to achieve harmonious proportions. Some designers strictly
follow the golden section and believe it supplies the ideal proportions for a grid structure. The formula for the golden section is a : b = b : (a+b). This translates to mean that the smaller of the two elements relates to the larger element in the same way that the larger element relates to the two combined parts. (In

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