Conformity and punishments for norm violators

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conformity and punishments for norm violators Sanctions help to establish social control , the formal and informal mechanisms used to increase conformity to values and norms and thus increase social cohesion Multiculturalism : values diverse racial, ethnic, national, and linguistic backgrounds and thus encourages the retention of cultural differences within society, rather than assimilation Dominant culture : refers to the values, norms, and practices of the group within society that is most powerful in terms of wealth, prestige, status, and influence Subculture : a group within society that is differentiated by its distinctive values, norms, and lifestyle Counterculture : a group within society that openly rejects, and may actively oppose, society’s values and norms Cultures usually change slowly and incrementally, though change can also happen in rapid and dramatic ways At times, a subculture can influence the mainstream and become part of dominant culture, or something that is dominant can change to a counterculture Normlessness - also known as “anomie”. Is used to describe the alienation and loss of purpose that result from weaker social bonds and an increased pace of change
Counterculture - a group within society that openly rejects or actively openly rejects or actively opposes society’s values and norms Cultural relativism - the principle of understanding other cultures on their own terms, rather than judging or evaluating according to one’s culture Cultural diffusion - the dissemination of material and symbolic culture (tools and technology, belief’s and behavior) from one group to another Cultural leveling - the process by which cultures that were once unique and distinct become increasingly similar Structural Functionalism - a paradigm based on the assumption that society is a unified whole that functions because of the contributions of its separate structures Conflict theory - a paradigm that sees social conflict as the basis of society and social change and that emphasizes a materialist view of society, a critical view of the status quo and a dynamic model of historical change Symbolic interactionism- a paradigm that sees interaction and meaning as central to society and assumes that meanings are not inherent but are created through interaction Post modernism - a paradigm that suggests that social reality diverse, pluralistic, and constantly in flux Ideal Culture : the norms, values, and patterns of behavior that members of a society believe should be observed in principle Real culture : the norms, values, and patterns of behavior that actually exist within a society (which may or may not corrected to the society’s ideals) Social control: the formal and informal mechanisms used to elicit conformity to values and norms and thus promote social cohesion 9/15, textbook, chapter 4:
Socialization is the process of learning and internalizing the values, beliefs, and norms of our social group The socialization process begins in infancy and lasts throughout the lifetime

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