Quote 6 to love that well which thou must leave ere

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sets us up for the payoff in the next line, where the speaker will let us know exactly what he means. Quote #6 To love that well which thou must leave ere long. (14) There you have it. Whether or not you see the final twist in the poem as foreshadowed earlier on, the final idea is clear: the speaker thinks that knowing their love can't last forever will make the listener love him all the more. Does that sound like aconvincing argument to you? Sonnet 73 Theme of Man and the Natural World The first two quatrains of Shakespeare's Sonnet 73 feature extended metaphors comparing the speaker's situation in life to some aspect from the natural world, like autumn trees and darkening skies. The general idea is that the speaker's youth is behind him, that age is approaching, but that he still has some spark of life left. All that natural imagery really hammers home one of the central ideas of the poem—that oncoming death is relentless, inevitable, and, well… natural. Quote #1 That time of year thou mayst in me behold, (1) Shakespeare draws parallels between humans and the naturalworld from the very beginning of the poem—and, as you can see here, invites us, the readers, to "behold" these connections. Why do you think he insists on these parallels so much? Could it be a way of emphasizing the inevitability of the processes of aging? Quote #2 When yellow leaves, or none, or few, do hang
ENG2602 PRESCRIBED POEMS (SOME) ANALYSIS FOR 2017 Upon those boughs which shake against the cold, (2-3) In these lines, the speaker continues the initial parallel he drew in line 1, comparing himself and his position in life to a tree just before winter. Because everybody in Shakespeare's initial audience would have known what winter feels like (Shakespeare probably wasn't writing with readers from equatorial regions in mind), this parallel between human experience and the naturalworld would have communicated instantly what the speaker was getting at. All you folks from Maine know what we're talking about. Quote #3 Bare ruined choirs, where late the sweet birds sang. (4) Something weird is definitely going on here—it's as if the speaker's general metaphor has doubled back on itself. Now, all of a sudden, he is describing nature in human terms, comparing the boughs of the tree to the wooden "choirs" (i.e. choir benches in a church) "where late the sweet birds sang." So which way is it, Mr. Shakespeare-man: are humans like nature, or is nature like humans? Why do you think the poet would want to mix things up like this? Could he just be showing off? Quote #4 In me thou seest the twilight of such day, As after sunset fadeth in the west, (5-6) These lines take us back to the same sort of idea as at the beginning of the poem: the speaker's process of growing old is compared to some process in nature where a bright, colorful thing (here, the day) gets replaced by a cold, dark, deathlike thing. Just as at the beginning of the poem, we think Shakespeare probably does this to emphasize the inevitability of death by connecting it to an experience everyone can relate to. What's your take?

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