Large scale property owners had alternatives for they could feed hogs on their

Large scale property owners had alternatives for they

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Large-scale property owners had alternatives, for they could feed hogs on their premises and watch them more closely. In the long run they accom- modated the loss of the open range better than most whites. In 1866 por? tions of several Black-Belt counties secured a law requiring owners to enclose livestock, sparing planters the expense of maintaining fences. Several Tennessee Valley areas followed suit. Less prosperous southern 11. Bureau of the Census, Compendium ofthe Ninth U.S. Census, 1870, 707; E. T. Tayloe to W. H. Tayloe, "Records of Ante-Bellum Southern Plantations," ed. Kenneth M. Stampp, 19 November 1866, #104,29 December 1867, #139, and 7 January 1868, #145, series M, pt. 1, reel 20; KKK, 10: 1518-19, 1530, 1810. 12. Octavia Otey Diary, entriesfor 22 March and 6 April 1867; 6,7 February, 10 April, 9 May, 29 November, and 3, 6 December 1868; 19 January and 1 February 1869, Wyche and Otey Family Papers, Southern HistoricalCollection.
KuKluxKlan / 193 whites, as Steven Hahn has argued, were far less willing to see the range disappear, contesting the expansion of fence laws into the upcoun? open had An examination of indicted Klansmen in the upland area of Youngsville underscores this point. The agricultural census of 1870 shows that Phillips of Tallapoosa County owned a farm worth $560. He also owned ten swine, four mules, four cows, and two horses valued at $800. Brown, living nearby, owned a small farm worth $300, with animals $270. These examples of the high proportion of livestock value were James Epps worth typi? Far to the band When planters defended or excused the Klan in public, they about theft. Nightriders operated at the intersection of shared white talked prop? 13. Alabama General Assembly, Acts ofthe Session of 1865-1866, ofthe General Assembly of Alabama (Montgomery, 1866), 334. 14. Bureau ofthe Census, Manuscript Agricultural Schedules for Alabama,1870, Tallapoosa County, Southern Historical Collection. The 1870 manuscript census for Tallapoosa County shows Youngsville precinct as having a total wealth of $39,795 in land and $38,140 in livestock. This is atypical of the county

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