2 act critically as they apply principles taught in

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Fundamentals of Management
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 1
Fundamentals of Management
Griffin
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2. Act critically as they apply principles taught in the course to communication situations. 3. Evaluate the rhetorical context of a given writing situation and write accordingly Included in this evaluation are adapting to the communication situation by analyzing the audience, the writer’s role, and the appropriate ethical dimensions. 4. Apply concepts of information design These concepts include effective ways to design documents for print, web, and other electronic means of communication in order to construct documents meaningful to the audience. 5. Effectively create standard formats used to construct meaningful documents. These formats include genres such as various kinds of reports, sets of instructions, letters and memos, and various electronic genres. 6. Use visual items in effectively constructing meaning in communication situations .These items include, but are not limited to, tables and graphs, photographs, drawings and schematics, and various electronic creations such as screen captures. 7. Effectively negotiate the process of completing technical documents. These processes include planning, drafting, editing and revising to quality standards, and, where appropriate, usability testing, research methods and appropriate citation of sources. 8. Recognize and accommodate global concepts. These concepts include localization, translation, and globalization. 9. Create clear, concise technical documents that effectively use style and grammar and information structure in ways that create meaning with the reader. 10. Collaborate effectively in various writing situations, including planning, creating, managing, evaluating, editing and revising document production You’re probably wondering what this “technical writing thing” is. Someone may even have told you, “it’s this course where they make you write about rocket science and brain surgery.” Well, not really . . . . Actually, the field of technical communica- tions is a fully professional field with degree programs, certifications, and—yes!—even theory. It’s a good field with a lot of growth and income potential; and an introductory technical-writing course for which this book has been developed is a good way to start if you are interested in a career in this field. However, the focus for technical-writing courses is not necessar- ily career as a technical writer but an introduction to the kinds of writing skills you need in practically any technically oriented professional job. No matter what sort of professional work you do, you’re likely to do lots of writing—and much of it technical in nature. The more you know about some basic technical- writing skills, which are covered in this guide and in technical-writing courses, the better job of writing you’re likely to do. And that will be good for the projects you work on, for the organizations you work in, and—most of all—good for you and your career.
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Fundamentals of Management
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Chapter 12 / Exercise 1
Fundamentals of Management
Griffin
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