Nontherapeutic communication technique social response

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Nontherapeutic Communication Technique Social response Definition/Explanation Responding in a way that either focuses attention on the nurse instead of the client, or is not goal-directed on behalf of the client. Nontherapeutic Communication Technique Invalidation Definition/Explanation Ignoring or denying the client's thoughts or feelings. Nontherapeutic Communication Technique Overloading Definition/Explanation Talking rapidly, changing subjects or asking for more information than can be absorbed at one time; for example, asking two questions at once. Nontherapeutic Communication Technique Underloading Definition/Explanation Remaining silent and unresponsive, not picking up cues and failing to give feedback. Nontherapeutic Communication Technique Incongruence Definition/Explanation "Please stay calm" but voice is shrill Sending verbal and nonverbal messages that contradict one another; often called a double message. Nontherapeutic Value judgments Definition/Explanation Giving one's own opinion, evaluating , moralizing or implying one's own values by using words such as "should," "ought," "good," or "bad."
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Communication - Hearing Loss RN Lesson 4 Psychosocial Integrity Clients with Hearing Loss o Findings of hearing loss speech deterioration indifference social withdrawal suspicion tendency to dominate conversation misinterpretation of what is said lack of response to direct questioning o Nursing interventions speak slowly and distinctly; do not shout face client directly make sure your face is clearly visible before the discussion, tell client the topic you are going to discuss insure that client has access to hearing aid and that it is functional keep sentences short and simple use written information to enhance spoken word use lower tone of voice Communication - Aphasia RN Lesson 4 Psychosocial Integrity
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Clients with Aphasia o Injured cerebral cortex blocks some language-related functions o Types of aphasia global aphasia - the most severe form of aphasia where individuals cannot read, write, or understand speech Broca's aphasia ("non-fluent" aphasia) - speech is limited mainly to short utterances of less than four words; the client may understand speech and be able to read but has limited writing ability Wernicke's aphasia ("fluent" aphasia) - inability to understand the meaning of spoken words and reading and writing is impaired; able to speak but sentences do not hang together and speech may consist of mostly jargon o Nursing interventions face client and establish eye contact avoid completing client's statements use gestures, pictures, and communication boards limit conversation to practical matters use the same words and gestures for objects keep background noise to a minimum and turn off competing sounds, e.g., radio, television do not shout or speak loudly give the client time to understand and respond if client has problems speaking, ask "yes" or "no" questions Communication - Stroke & Dementia RN Lesson 4 Psychosocial Integrity Clients post-CVA
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