What are the order of changes in puberty in girls First for most girls their

What are the order of changes in puberty in girls

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What are the order of changes in puberty in girls?: What are the order of changes in puberty in boys?: Whose growth spurt occurs first? When are physical peaks and beginning of decline?:
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- Peak from 19-26 or early adulthood Menopause and Andropause: - Menopause: - The time in middle age, usually in the late forties or early fifties, where a woman has not had her menstrual period for a full year - The average age of a woman having her last period is age 52 - Andropause: - Includes fatigue and a decrease in libido in middle aged men, and attributed to a gradual decline in testosterone levels Neuron, Basic Parts/Functions: - Dendrites – Receive information from other neurons, muscles, or glands through the axon - Soma – Also known as the cell body - Nucleus - Axon – Transmit information away from the cell body - Myelin – Speeds information transmission - Axon Terminal - Neurotransmitters – The communication in the synapse occurs through the release of these chemicals - Synaptic Vesicles – Store various neurotransmitters that are released at the synapse - Synapse – The junction between two nerve cells - Receptor – Responds to the neurotransmitter CNS: Brain and Spinal Cord: - Special Protection: - Encased in dura mater - Floating in CSF - Surrounded by cranial and spinal bones PNS: Motor, Sensory, and Autonomic Nerves: - Somatosensory Input - Motor Output - Autonomic Nervous System: - Sympathetic – Fight or Flight - Mobilizes for energy, accelerates, diffuse and widespread, adrenaline, NE/E, pupils dilate, HR increases, skin perspires, respiration and pulse increase - Parasympathetic—Rest and digest - Slows and digests, discrete, ACh, pupils constrict, HR decreases, skin dries, respiration decreases, promotes digestion and salivation Know the Basic Functions of the Four Lobes:
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- Frontal: - Pre-Frontal Cortex: Strategy formation, associative learning, attention, risk taking, rule breaking, motor inhibition, and smell - Motor: Voluntary control of skeletal muscles, speech production (Broca’s Area) - Parietal: - Pain and position, touch sensory, math, body image, spatial ability and drawing, contralateral - Temporal: - Hearing, speech comprehension (Wernicke’s area), categorization and organization, memory, fear – contains amygdala and hippocampus - Occipital: - Vision Cerebellum, Subcortical Structures (Amygdala, Hippocampus and Hypothalamus): - Cerebellum: - Motor Coordination, motor or procedural memory - Unconscious, implicit memory - Amygdala: - No amygdala, no fear - Recognition of what to avoid - Temporal Lobe - Hippocampus: - Conscious, declarative memory - Hypothalamus: - Behavioral expression of emotion (such as fight or flight), regulates sexual behavior through hormones, thirst, hunger, body temperature Know specialization of the left and right hemispheres, which visual field send information to each hemisphere and which side of the body each hemisphere controls:
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  • Spring '08
  • Michalski
  • DNA, Middle Income Children

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