Decide sign hung in small catalan town outside

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Decide”Sign hung in small Catalan town outside Tortosa after constitutional process is blocked in 2010© John Dagenais
Catalans hold a referendum in November 2014 on independence; central government calls referendum illegal: with more than 80% of those in favor of autonomySeptember 27, 2015: Independence parties (Candidatura UnitatPopular [CUP] and Junts pel sí [composed of ConvergènciaDemocràtica de Catalunya (CDC) + Esquerra Republicana de Catalunya (ERC)] + Assemblea Nacional Catalana) win majority in Catalan parliamentary elections: vow to begin declaration of Catalunya as separate country.
June 9, 2017: Catalan President Carlos Puigdemont announces a new independence referendum set for Oct. 1. Catalan officials say they will proclaim a new republic within 48 hours of the vote if a “yes” vote wins, regardless of turnout.Sept. 7: Spain’s Constitutional Court suspends the ballot after a legal challenge from the central government in Madrid.Sept. 20-21: A dozen Catalan officials are arrested by Spanish police for organizing the independence referendum. Police also seize 10 million ballot papers in a crackdown. The following day, the Constitutional Court says it will fine 22 Catalan electoral board members between 6,000 euros ($7,000) and 12,000 euros ($14,200) daily for failing to comply with the court order suspending the vote.Sept. 29-30: The national government vows to block the vote while Catalan officials vow to proceed with it. Activists and parents occupy Catalonia schools to be used as polling locations. Police give them an ultimatum to leave by 6 a.m. on Oct. 1, the day of the vote.This timeline cites or paraphrases: -timeline-developments-n815091
Oct. 3: Spanish King Felipe VI accuses secessionists of fracturing society in a televised speech. Hours later, Puigdemont says Catalonia will declare independence within 48 hours once the official votes are counted.Oct. 10-11: Puigdemont hesitates to make a formal declaration of independence during a highly anticipated speech to the Catalan Parliament. The next morning, Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy activates the Spanish constitution’s so-called nuclear option to suspend Catalonia’s political autonomy.Oct. 1: Hundreds of people are injured as armed police descend on polling locations in Catalonia while defiant voters cast ballots in the banned referendum. Catalan officials say about 90 percent voted for secession, with about 42 percent voter turnout. The officials vow to press on with independence.
Oct. 21: Rajoy decides to fire Catalonia’s government and force a new election. Catalan Parliament Speaker Carme Forcadell responds in a televised speech, denouncing Rajoy’s actions as a “coup” and an “attack against democracy.”Oct. 27: Catalonia declares independence from Spain in defiance of Madrid’s efforts to prevent secession. The declaration is deemed mostly symbolic because it is unlikely Spain or the international community will recognize an independent Catalonia. Spain fires Catalonia's regional government and dissolves its parliament

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