Places to the left if n is a negative integer if

Info icon This preview shows pages 11–20. Sign up to view the full content.

places to the left if n is a negative integer. If necessary additional zeros are inserted to make up the required number of decimal places. 11 Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra
Image of page 11

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Then, for example, the number 5000 can be written 5 × 1000 = 5 × 10 3 the number 403 can be written 4 . 03 × 100 = 4 . 03 × 10 2 the number 0.009 can be written 9 × 0 . 001 = 9 × 10 - 3 Now do this exercise Write the number 0.00678 in scientific notation. Answer Example Engineering Constants Many constants appearing in engineering calculations are expressed in scientific notation. For example the charge on an electron equals 1 . 6 × 10 - 19 coulomb and the speed of light is 3 × 10 8 ms - 1 . Avagadro’s constant is equal to 6 . 023 × 10 26 and is the number of atoms in one kilomole of an element. Clearly the use of scientific notation avoids writing lengthy strings of zeros. Your scientific calculator will be able to accept numbers in scientific notation. Often the E button is used and a number like 4 . 2 × 10 7 will be entered as 4 . 2 E 7. Note that 10E4 means 10 × 10 4 , that is 10 5 . To enter the number 10 3 say, you would key in 1 E 3. Entering powers of 10 incorrectly is a common cause of error. You must check how your particular calculator accepts numbers in scientific notation. Now do this exercise Use your calculator to find 4 . 2 × 10 - 3 × 3 . 6 × 10 - 4 . This exercise is designed to check that you can enter numbers given in scientific notation into your calculator. Answer More exercises for you to try 1. Express each of the following numbers in scientific notation: a) 45, b) 456, c) 2079, d) 7000000, e) 0 . 1, f) 0 . 034, g) 0.09856 2. Simplify 6 × 10 24 × 1 . 3 × 10 - 16 Answer Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra 12
Image of page 12
End of Block 1.2 13 Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra
Image of page 13

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

1. a) 27, b) 243, c) 32, 2. a) 0.04, b) 225 3. a) 343, b) 4651.7. 4. a) 7 5 , b) t 4 , c) ( 1 2 ) 2 ( 1 7 ) 3 5. a) 4 9 , b) 8 125 , c) 1 4 , d) 1 8 , e) 0 . 1 3 means (0 . 1) × (0 . 1) × (0 . 1) = 0 . 001 Back to the theory Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra 14
Image of page 14
All quantities have the same base. To multiply the quantities together, the indices are added: y 9 Back to the theory 15 Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra
Image of page 15

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

(a) The bases are the same, and the division is carried out by subtracting the indices: 5 9 - 7 = 5 2 = 25 (b) y 5 - 2 = y 3 Back to the theory Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra 16
Image of page 16
x 2 × 5 = x 10 Back to the theory 17 Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra
Image of page 17

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Again, using the third law, the two powers are multiplied: e x × y = e xy Back to the theory Engineering Mathematics: Open Learning Unit Level 0 1.2: Basic Algebra 18
Image of page 18
Image of page 19

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

Image of page 20
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Winter '10
  • John Schaefer
  • Math, Open Learning, Open Learning Unit, Learning Unit Level

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern