4 Respecting compressed air A terrific force is contained in an inflated tire

4 respecting compressed air a terrific force is

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4. Respecting compressed air. A terrific force is contained in an inflated tire. An explosion of the tire-and-wheel assembly can result from improper or careless mounting procedures. Never stand over a tire while inflating it. If the tire explodes, the sudden release of compressed air has enough energy to throw a person more than 30 feet (9 m) in the air. People have been seriously injured or killed by exploding tires. Date Performing Underchassis Preventive Maintenance Page no.
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5. Protecting your eyes Wear eye protection (safety glasses, safety goggles, or a face shield) when demounting and mounting tires. When deflating a tire, avoid the air stream from the tire valve. The air comes out at high speed and can blow dirt or debris into your eyes. Checking Tire Pressure and Inflating Tires Before checking tire pressure and adding air, know the correct pressure for the tire. The specification is in the owners manual and on the vehicle tire-information label. When the vehicle is carrying a heavy load, pulling a trailer, or driving at sustained highway speed, higher tire pressure may be necessary. Maximum pressure should never exceed the maximum pressure marked on the tire sidewall. Inflation pressure is given for a cold tire. Pressure increases as tire temperature rises. Highway driving on a hot day can increase the tire pressure from 5 to 7 psi (35 to 48 kPa). As the tire cools, it loses pressure. Never bleed a hot tire to reduce its pressure. The pressure will then be low when the tire cools. Install the cap on the tire valve after checking pressure or adding air. Tire Inspection The purpose of inspecting tires is to determine if they are safe for further use. When defects or improper wear patterns are found, inform the driver. Recommend the services that will correct the cause of the abnormal wear. Tires have tread-wear indicators or wear bars. These are filled-in sections of the tread grooves that will show when the tread has worn down to 1/16 inch (1.6 mm). A tire with a wear bar showing is worn out and should be replaced. Too little tread remains for continued safe driving. A tread-depth gauge can be inserted into the tread grooves to measure tread depth of at least 1/32 inch (0.8 mm) in any two adjacent grooves at any location on the tire. Check for bulges in the sidewalls. Bulges mean plies have separated and the tire could fail at any time. Tires with separated or broken plies should be replaced. Date Performing Underchassis Preventive Maintenance Page no.
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OPERATION SHEET No. 1(LO7) Wheels and Tires Examine the sidewalls and tread area of each tire in turn. Check for cuts, tears, and lumps, bulges, separation of the tread, and exposure of the ply or cord. Check that the tire bead is correctly seated on the wheel rim, that the valve is sound and properly seated, and that the wheel is not distorted or damaged.
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