Copyright 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health Lippincott Williams Wilkins Thoracic cage

Copyright 2014 wolters kluwer health lippincott

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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Thoracic cage Sternum- breast bone Ribs- Partially protect the chest cavity, where there are vital organs ex. Heart. Cartilage- strong, elastic type of tissue in the joints and other places such as ears. Made up of specialized cells called “chondrocytes” due to the lack of blood vessels, it grows and repairs more slowly than other tissues Xiphoid Process- smallest region of the breast bone (sternum) Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Spinal Column Cervical Has two meaning: pertaining to neck or pertaining to the female cervix Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (inferior end of the spine) Coccygeal- Tail bone Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Appendicular Skeleton Shoulder bones Arm and hand bones Pelvis bones Leg and feet bones
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Shoulder Clavicle (collar bone) Scapula (shoulder blade) Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Arm and Hand Humerus- Largest bone in the arm and the only bone in the upper arm Radius- More lateral and slightly shorter of the two forearm bones. Ulna (elbow bone) Carpals- Your wrist is made up of eight small bones (carpal bones) plus two long bones in your forearm the radius and the ulna.
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Arms and Hand Cont. Metacarpals- Long bones within the hand that are connected to the carpals Phalanges- The bones of the fingers and of the toes. There are generally three phalanges (distal, middle, proximal) for each digit except the thumbs & large toes.
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Arm and Hand (cont’d) Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Pelvis Os coxae : (2 hip bones which are a fusion of 3 bones Ilium Ischium Pubis Sacrum
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Leg Femur Tibia Fibula Patella
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Pelvis and Leg Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Foot Tarsals Metatarsal s Phalanges Malleolus Calcaneus Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
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Copyright © 2014 Wolters Kluwer Health | Lippincott Williams & Wilkins Joints Joints - “meeting place” between bones Synarthrosis- joint with no movement (cranial bones) Amphiarthrosis- joint with little movement (vertebrae) Diarthrosis or synovial- joint with free movement (knee)
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