The reasons for this vary but it is often because people understand the story

The reasons for this vary but it is often because

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groups, and it reached the top 48 most censored stories. The reasons for this vary, but it is often because people understand the story as an attack on tradition for the sake of tradition. This can make many people, especially those who believe in those traditions, uncomfortable. More recently the story has been banned less as the themes of this story have become more popular, but there are still many schools in which teachers and librarians are not allowed to give this story to their students. The author of “The Lottery” was also subject to such shaming. Brighthubeducaton describes the response to her as mixed but largely negative. It goes on to say “The reaction of the public to this story and the meaning of the story itself was something that Shirley Jackson rarely commented on. She refused to discuss the meaning of her work or publicize her stories, often turning down interviews. She gave only two real comments on the story. The first being the previously mentioned statement that South Africa understood the meaning, and a comment that she found it difficult to express its meaning outside of the story. This reluctance of the author to comment on the story is partially responsible for some critics dismissal of the story and failure to probe further to understand its meaning.
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Nicole Smith describes Shirley Jackson with a bit more sass, “Shirley Jackson is a master at manipulating her reader, a tactic that pays off as the story unfolds and all of the things that once seemed pleasant are shown to have a very dark side. The title of the “The Lottery” alone is a great example of how Shirley Jackson topples reader expectations; we usually hear the word “lottery” and are filled with a sense of hope and possibility; we are expecting it is going to be a story about someone who wins something. Little do we know what a grim prize it will be, of course. The title of “The Lottery” itself can serve as a thesis statement for writing about the story . One of the other ways “The Lottery” turns readers on their heads is because of the contrast between scenes of normal small town life—a life that is so often idealized—versus the grim reality of what the lottery really is.” Her analysis of the story is a bit more critical as it depicts the horror of the story. “The horror of the lottery sinks in well after the reader has finished a first pass of the text and has time to go back and revisit some of the events. For instance, when we consider that this has been described as a “civic” activity in the same vein as other community events like dances or teenage clubs, we see how disturbingly ingrained and “normal” ritual violence has become. Other elements of true horror also sink later; for example, consider young Davy Hutchinson, so young he can barely hold the slip of paper in his tight baby fist—what if he had drawn the slip of paper. There was no mention about who could or could not be stoned, so who’s to say the child would not have been immune? Is it right to consider that a child could be stoned to death (or not —we are never told when it ends) since, after all, all children are allowed to throw the stones along with the adults?
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  • Summer '19
  • The Lottery, Short story, The New Yorker, Stoning, Rajm

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