Analyzing the policy (Repaired)

The staes and school districts are also major actors

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The Staes and school districts are also major actors. They have the responsibility to implement directives from the federal Educaiton Agencies. They have the greater responsibility to train their staff and enforce culture changes in their processes and procedures. Most importantly everything that they do will greatly impact the children and how well they are learning. Developing an effective curriculum is vitial to reaching the goal that the federal government has set before them. President Obama, his administration, and congress have found it vital that states have some kind of standards for education and bridging education gaps. The federal Government Has implemented SSA. States now have the responsibility to enforce its guiltiness in its schools to be in compliance with the federal government to continue to receive funding. Through SAA States and its school districts would be financially responsible for their failing schools. School districts will have to carry the financial burden of low performing schools and try to bring them up to standards. States should not only be held accountable financially but with the federal government as well if they do not properly govern the low performing schools. While states do need to be held responsible they still need some federal regulation.
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Running head: Analyzing the Policy 6 Bibliography Birkland, T. A. (2011). An Introduction to the Policy Process. Armonk: M.E Sharpe. Education, U. D. (2005, February). NCLB Annual Report. Retrieved October 26, 2012, from No Child Left Behind: Kline, J. (2012, January 8). Studnet Success Act. Retrieved October 27, 2012, from edworkforce: Senior Staff. (2012, July 13). Retrieved November 17, 2012, from U.S. Department of Education: THE STUDENT SUCCESS ACT (H.R. 3989). (2012, January). Retrieved November 17, 2012, from
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