COMM
Research Proposal Part I.docx

G a persons age and you propose an experimental

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characteristic” (e.g., a person’s age) and you propose an experimental design, you will not receive full credit for the “research design” component. Also, NOT following any of the formatting guidelines described above and below or turning in a poorly written document will result in point deductions. (1) Title (2) Provide a brief introduction to your topic. (3) State the main objective of the study.
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(4) Provide a rationale as to why your topic is important (i.e., why should anyone care about your topic). (5) State your hypothesis. It must be a causal hypothesis.
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(6) Explain why you have this particular hypothesis. This requires you briefly describe the theory that generated the hypothesis. (7) Describe the general research design. The design can be experimental or observational. (8) Provide a brief justification as to why you are using a particular research design. Your justification can be based on reasons related to the internal or external validity of the study (or both). (9) State what knowledge you expect to gain after the study has been conducted. (10) Include a references section in APA style. (1) Examining the Effects of Humorous News Stories on Public Policy Attitudes Using Experimental Techniques (2) One of the major changes occurring in the current media environment is the decline in audiences for traditional news outlets and the growing popularity of news-entertainment genres. This is especially true for young adults, who increasingly turn to entertainment-oriented programing as one of their trusted sources of political information (Pew Research, 2004). In response, there has been an explosion of studies examining how one dominant form of infotainment—late night comedies (e.g., The Daily Show, The Tonight Show)—influence the political behaviors, attitudes, and knowledge of their viewers (Kim & Vishak, 2008; Nabi et al., 2007).
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