Something else after all and so its another case of

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something else after all.And so it’s another case of ‘uncertainty’. So why should we rush inand believe things? Why should we put our trust so much in what otherssay? Whatever we hear we should take note of, be patient, look into thematter carefully and stay straight.It’s not that we write whatever pops into our heads as some sort oftruth. Any speech which ignores uncertainty is not the speech of a sage.Remember this. Whatever we see or hear, be it pleasant or sorrowful,just say ‘this is not sure!’ Say it heavy to yourself, hold it all down withthis. Don’t build those things up into major issues, just keep them alldown to this one. This point is the important one. This is the point wheredefilements die. Practitioners shouldn’t dismiss it.If you disregard this point you can expect only suffering, expect onlymistakes. If you don’t make this a foundation for your practice you aregoing to go wrong; but then you will come right again later on, becausethis principle is a really good one.Actually the real Dhamma, the gist of what I have been saying today,isn’t so mysterious. Whatever you experience is simply form, simply feel-ing, simply perception, simply volition, and simply consciousness. Thereare only these basic qualities; where is there any certainty within them?609
The Collected Teachings of Ajahn ChahIf we come to understand the true nature of things like this, lust, infatu-ation and attachment fade away. Why do they fade away? Because weunderstand, we know. We shift from ignorance to understanding. Under-standing is born from ignorance, knowing is born from unknowing, purityis born from defilement. It works like this.Not discardinganiccaṃ, the Buddha – this is what it means to say thatthe Buddha is still alive. To say that the Buddha has passed intoNibbānais not necessarily true. In a more profound sense the Buddha is still alive.It’s much like how we define the word ‘bhikkhu’. If we define it as ‘onewho asks’,1the meaning is very broad. We can define it this way, but touse this definition too much is not so good – we don’t know when to stopasking! If we were to define this word in a more profound way we wouldsay: ‘Bhikkhu – one who sees the danger ofsaṃsāra.’Isn’t this more profound? It doesn’t go in the same direction as the pre-vious definition, it runs much deeper. The practice of Dhamma is like this.If you don’t fully understand it, it becomes something else again. When itis fully understood, then it becomes priceless, it becomes a source of peace.When we have sati, we are close to the Dhamma. If we have sati wewill seeaniccaṃ, the transience of all things. We will see the Buddha andtranscend the suffering of saṃsāra, if not now, then sometime in the future.If we throw away the attribute of the Noble Ones, the Buddha or theDhamma, our practice will become barren and fruitless. We must maintainour practice constantly, whether we are working or sitting or simply lyingdown. When the eye sees form, the ear hears sound, the nose smells an

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Term
Winter
Professor
N/A
Tags
Ajahn Chah, Thai Forest tradition

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