He believes if the subsidy system was reformed to remove the inequities within

He believes if the subsidy system was reformed to

This preview shows page 48 - 51 out of 64 pages.

difference in his opinion. He believes if the subsidy system was reformed to remove the inequities within it, many issues such as hunger, health, environment, and poverty could be positively changed for the better. Finally, I ended with the same exact question for each of my interviewees. It was short, straight to the point, and I only allowed them to answer it initially with a yes or no response. I simply asked my original question that I have been researching from the beginning of this semester: Should this bill pass? Goddard explained that yes, this bill must pass in
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Sample Paper 49 order for the Capital Area Food Bank, or any food bank to have a chance in adequately addressing hunger. Without a current farm bill, federal funds will disappear quickly, and when the shelves at the food bank are empty, people will then look for food in manners that are not always safe. She told me that everyday the farm bill does not pass; more and more people have to wonder where their next meal will come from. While this may statement might have been exaggerated to some extent, it offered a perspective I had never considered. For some people, this bill will provide them sustenance and a means for consumption for an extended period of time. It doesn’t only affect corn farmers in the Mid-west it affects impoverished families on the east side of Austin. Wispelwey countered this argument by stating that unless this bill undergoes serious reform it should not pass. He recognized that he understood that organizations as the Capital Area Food Bank desperately require these funds in order to operate, but he also noted that if the current subsidy system is permitted to function without reform, we will need more and more food banks as time goes on. To Wispelwey, food banks are essentially a band aid trying to cover a gaping wound. He maintains that if we could address the real issue, which is the perpetuation of inequality through legislative policies, we could eliminate the need for food banks and end hunger and poverty. My interview experiences caused me to reflect for several days. I tossed both sides back and forth for over a week, because for the first time I saw the humanity in each side and how it directly affected people within my
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Sample Paper 50 own community. Lisa Goddard was confident that the farm bill was necessary in order to address hunger in Austin. She drew from personal experiences, and I could sense without a doubt she was speaking without any hesitation in her belief. However, what I feel she failed to recognize was that while the farm bill does succeed in funding vital food donation and food bank centers across the nation, it fails in addressing a slew of other issues besides hunger. Unfortunately, the farm bill is not set up to only address one issue and affects many other programs such as school lunch programs, ethanol research, and conservation programs. I think many people like Goddard do not scrutinize the bill once their interests (i.e. their funds are secured) have been satisfied. While her mentioning of families and
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