You are pretty we know and a girl it is true and rich

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Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
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Chapter 1 / Exercise 27
Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
Larson
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You are pretty, we know, and a girl, it is true, and rich – truly, who can deny it? But when you praise yourself too much, Fabulla, you are neither rich nor pretty nor a girl. (Fabulla’s boasting evokes, not a girlish modesty, but the arrogance of a braggart.) ON LESBIA’S HUSBAND Ille mi par esse deo videtur, ille, si fas est, superare divos, qui, sedens adversus, identidem te spectat et audit dulce ridentem, misero quod omnis eripit sensus mihi: nam simul te,
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Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
The document you are viewing contains questions related to this textbook.
Chapter 1 / Exercise 27
Mathematical Practices, Mathematics for Teachers: Activities, Models, and Real-Life Examples
Larson
Expert Verified
4 TEACHER’S GUIDE and ANSWER KEY for WHEELOCK’S LATIN: Ch. 34 Lesbia, aspexi, nihil est super mi, [Lesbia, vocis,] lingua sed torpet, tenuis sub artus flamma demanat, sonitu suopte tintinant aures, gemina teguntur lumina nocte. Otium, Catulle, tibi molestum est; otio exsultas nimiumque gestis; otium et reges prius et beatas perdidit urbes. That man seems to me to be equal to a god, that man, if it is right (to say), (seems) to surpass the gods, who, sitting opposite (you), again and again gazes at you and hears (you) sweetly laughing, a circumstance that snatches all senses from wretched me: for as soon as I have looked upon you, nothing of my voice (no voice/speech) remains for me, Lesbia, but my tongue grows numb, a slender flame flows down beneath my limbs, my ears ring with their own sound, my eyes are covered by twin night. Leisure is troublesome for you, Catullus; you exult in leisure and you behave excessively without restraint; leisure has in the past destroyed both kings and blessed cities. (Ask students to answer the comprehension questions on these passages in the Lectiones B section of the Workbook; remember that an answer key to the Workbook is available to instructors online at . Remind your students to listen to Mark Miner’s readings of these Sententiae Ant § quae and reading passages on the CD’s in the set Readings from Wheelock’s Latin, and to have them review vocabulary using both the Vocabulary Cards for Wheelock’s Latin and the Cumulative Vocabulary Lists for Wheelock’s Latin, all of which can be ordered online at . )
TEACHER’S GUIDE and ANSWER KEY for WHEELOCK’S LATIN: Chapter 35 1 Chapter 35 rev. 5/13/06 OBJECTIVES Upon completion of this lesson, students should be able to: 1. Explain the basic function of the dative case. 2. Define, recognize, and translate the “dative with adjectives” construction.

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