Note wroth extends the analogy between her speaker

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Note: Wroth extends the analogy between her speaker and the Indians; the speaker’s request in the final four lines illustrates what the Norton editors claim, that instead of addressing her beloved, “she proclaims subjection to Cupid.” Read only: Sonnet 40 “False hope” p. 1568 (9thEdition) / p. 1118 (10thEdition)
23. In this sonnet about the dangers of false hope, Wroth uses the unlikely image of what in the first line (see footnote 8). to take away the misery love brings
24. What are those effects?
25: What are the speaker’s alternatives?
Sonnet 103 “My muse how happy” p. 1571 (9thEdition) / p. 1121 (10thEdition)The speaker, aware of herself as a poet, comes to an end in her sequence, again deployingthe figure of Cupid. She addresses her muse, telling it “write you no more.” At the beginning of the sestet, she says to “Leave the discourse of Venus and her son / To young Beginners…” (9-10). Would you characterize the female personal in Wroth’s sonnets as empowered or not? 26.Why? Use one quotation to support your claim.
27: Think about some of your favorite female screenwriters and comics today. Think of one inparticular who "appropriates" a traditionally male-centered genre or performance tradition.
G. The Carpe DiemLesson Open Second Media Resources Page in Week 5 of Moodle This lesson is comprised of an introductory, one-page, typed statement on the motif. Then there are seven (7) videos to watch. They are very, very short. You must watch all seven carpe diem videos and take a few notes for the midterm.
Midterm Exam will contain a very substantial essay question on the Carpe Diemmotif, expecting you to draw from three or more examples.

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