Second how are you coordinating with your mission

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Second, how are you coordinating with your mission partners? This can be accomplished by various methods, such as deployed liaison officers, agency reps working within your staff, coordination centers or working groups, and key leader engagements. These methods are situationally dependent and often change to reflect transitions within the operational environment. The third and final question addresses what can often be the most difficult step in the process: How are you sharing interorganizational perspectives within your organization to enrich the Commander's decision making? We will address each of these questions in the following slides.
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Identify Mission Partners The first question "Who are the mission partners?" requires the joint force command to consider all the elements involved in the mission. The joint force command must determine who its mission partners are, and what the relationship is with them. In some cases this will be well established. However, with uncertain or non-existent lines of communication and coordination, the military organization is often in a position of pro-actively reaching out and establishing working relationships with these partners. We will address these relationships and how coordination can be accomplished in the next slide. Beyond mission partners, it is critical to identify who the other external stakeholders are that can impact your mission and to determine what common goals you may have. It is important to keep in mind that this is a fluid process and should be revisited throughout all phases of an operation.
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Coordinating Options and Considerations- Once key mission partners have been identified, it is then imperative to begin the process of coordinating with them to gain unity of effort. This can be accomplished in numerous ways and there is no one single approach that works best in all situations. Each interorganizational partner brings its own culture, philosophy, goals, practices, expertise, and skills to the task of coordination. Roll over each of the bullets to learn more about some coordination mechanisms. Each U.S. Government agency has different capabilities, capacities, and authorities, all governing the operation of the agency and determining the use of its resources. Many commands have found that the coordination method or process may need adjustment over time, depending on changes in the operating environment. Sometimes the method must be uniquely established, based on the needs of the mission and the organizations involved. In other times, a doctrinal approach will suffice. Each option should be assessed for its effectiveness, bearing in mind certain considerations for each. LNO-liaison representative Battle Rhythm Events-inputs and sychronization
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Engagements-face-to-face meetings, personal relationship and sharing information Doctrinal Approaches-quickest and easiest, short-term mission such as Civil-Military Operations Center (CMOC), HACC or MNCC.
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  • Fall '18
  • partner, Federal government of the United States, United States Department of Homeland Security, United States Department of Defense

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