of Niani attracted merchants seeking to enter the gold trade c Besides the

Of niani attracted merchants seeking to enter the

This preview shows page 9 - 11 out of 16 pages.

of Niani attracted merchants seeking to enter the gold tradec.Besides the capital Niani, many other prosperous cities on caravan routesTimbuktu, Gao, and Jenne became prosperous centers featuring buildings of brick and stone5.Mansa Musa, Sundiata's grandnephew (reigned 1312-1337 C.E.)a.Made his pilgrimage to Mecca in 1324-1325 with huge caravanSundiata's grand-nephewLed during the high point of the empireCaravan included thousands of soldiers, attendants, subjects, and slaves as well as a hundred camels carrying satchels of goldProduced so much gold, he was about 25% on local marketsb.Upon return to Mali, built mosquesparticularly in the trading cities frequented by Muslim merchantsc.Sent students to study with distinguished Islamic scholars in northern Africad.Established Islamic schools in Mali6.Decline of Mali due to factions and military pressure from neighbors and nomadsfactions crippled the central governmentprovinces seceded from the empire
military pressures came both from neighboring kingdoms and from desert nomads7.The Songhay empire replaced Mali by the late fifteenth centuryThe Songhay empire had completely overcome the Mali empire by the fifteenth centuryBefore decline, they made sure that Islam would have a prominent place in west African societySonghay continued the same tradition of centralized governmentB.The Indian Ocean trade and Islamic states in east Africa1.Swahiliis an Arabic term meaning "coasters"a.Dominated east African coast from Mogadishu to SofalaThey took over Mogadishu, Kilwa, the Comoro Islands, andSofalab.Spoke Swahili, a Bantu language, supplemented with some ArabicwordsDeveloped different dialects, but they communicated readily among themselves because individuals frequently visited other Swahili communities in their oceangoing craftalso had similar development with respect to language, religion, architexture, and technologyc.Trade with Muslim merchants became important by the tenth centuryThey would get gold, slaves, ivory, and exotic local products such as tortoise shell and leopard skins from interior regions of east AfricaThey would trade these items for pottery, glass, and textilesTraded with Persia, India, and China2.The Swahili city-statesa.Chiefs gained power through taxing trade on portsstrengthened their own authority and increased the influence of their communitiesb.Ports developed into city-states governed by kings, eleventh and twelfth centuriesMogadishu, Lamu, Malindi, Mombasa, Zanzibar, Kilwa, Mozambique, and Sofala each developed into powerful city-states governed by a king who supervised trade and organized pubic life in the region3.Kilwa: good example of busy city-state on east coast; exported goldEarliest inhabitants most likely relied on fishing and engaged in a limited amount of tradeThey would import pottery and stoneware from other regions in east Africa and started to rely more on

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture