She is demanding reform to womens rights by means of

This preview shows page 3 - 5 out of 6 pages.

asserting her belief that Jefferson’s Declaration must be amended. She is demanding reform to women’s rights by means of exposing facts of women’s oppression and suffrage. While its content aims to inform the reader of the 19 th century woman, its rhetorical devices aim at employing the women to demand change. This sardonic assertion was as powerful in the 19- century as it is today. More recently, pop-culture’s Hamilton: An American Musical alludes to the “Declaration of Independence” in a very similar fashion. One of the female leads, Angelica Schuyler states, “We hold these truths to be self-evident that all men are created equal. And when I meet Thomas Jefferson Unh! I'mma compel him to include women in the sequel! Work!” ( Hamilton: An American Musical 2015). Stanton is very deliberate with syntax throughout her powerful and unmistakable statement. After setting the stage with her poke at Jefferson’s 72-years-younger “Declaration”, Stanton jumps into the crux of her speech with her set of fifteen assertions. With these assertions, Stanton outlines the oppression of women and their second-class standing in the eyes of the government and in the family. By writing these problems in a list form and with-in their own paragraph, Stanton is successful at drawing attention with the demands she is wishing to solve.
4 This list is a very specific representation of the way things should be and what is wrong in current society. Most impressively, this list tells the audience how to fix these problems. Among these assertions are: the fact that women cannot vote, women must follow laws that they have no business in making, marriage becomes a point of contention for women, not having the right to divorce or obtain custody of her children, made owning a business or having a good job impossible, women can’t get a college education, and even that God agrees that women are subordinate to men. Stanton elicits the most pathos with, “He has made her, if married, in the eye of the law, civilly dead”. By appealing to the audience’s emotions, Stanton aims at laying it all on the line and even jarring the reader into submission. Any audience member or reader hearing this should be struck by its direct and unabashed tone. Stanton’s tone throughout the speech is another very pointed device which helps her to persuade her audience to side with her cause. The

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture