DreamWorks Pictures came out with a story seemingly identical to the one she

Dreamworks pictures came out with a story seemingly

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DreamWorks Pictures came out with a story seemingly identical to the one she had relayed to Mr. Shifty a year later, but there was no proof stating whether or not the idea originated from Mary’s synopsis. The appalling success rate of these cases demonstrates that succeeding with a “stolen idea” case is extremely difficult. Most of these cases fall at the first hurdle. (Conclusion)
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Kelly Bishop BUL 4622 Z23381605 Due to the fact that Mary’s story was not copyrighted, nor specified that this was to remain confidential until further communication, Mary does not have a strong enough claim to bring a lawsuit against Mr. Shifty and DreamWorks Pictures for breach of an implied contract. There is not a solid foundation for her to move forward with such claim. Unfortunately, there is no effective way to protect an idea with any form of intellectual property protection without involving copyright or an agreement exchanged between the parties. The six elements of a legal contract are offer, acceptance, consideration, mutuality of obligation, competency and capacity, and a written instrument. An offer is a promise to act or refrain from acting, which is made in exchange for a return promise to do the same. This was not satisfied in Mary’s case, as she did not state to Mr. Shifty to act or refrain from acting on her synopsis she had sent. Acceptance of an offer is the expression of assent to its terms. Acceptance must generally be made in the manner specified by the offer, and neither Mary nor Mr. Shifty had any type of offer to begin with to have something be accepted. Next, each party to a contract must
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