{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Hubs the hub is probably the most important part of

Info iconThis preview shows pages 6–7. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Hubs The hub is probably the most important part of the networking puzzle. It is the core of almost any Ethernet setup, except for 10Base-2 networks which only require a 50 ohm terminator wherever a PC does not exist on the cable. The hub is used to bring all the PCs together and provide a single connector to a network server or another hub. The hub has varying numbers of ports, each port being where you plug in each PC. Hubs are quite simple. They do no error checking or data filtering. They just diligently pass data along. They preserve the electrical signal that passes through them, allowing you to span your network further than what is typically allowed in your Ethernet standard. There are both Manageable Hubs, which allow advanced configuration of Hub properties via a software package, and Standard Hubs, which are cheaper, and usually used for home or small office networks. We recommend purchasing a standard hub, since the extra features included in Manageable Hubs are not useful for a home or small office network. There are three types of hubs: Standalone hubs: a single hub. These hubs are the least expensive. They are expandable in that you can connect them to other standalone hubs. They boast a number ports, depending on the hub. They are best for smaller networks. Stackable Hubs: These are like standalone hubs, except that they can be stacked on top of one another. When stacked, they are connected via a short piece of cable and they act like one single modular hub, able to be controlled as one. These are ideal for those who want to start a network with minimal investment but with room for expansion. Modular Hubs: These are more ideal for the larger networks. These are bought as a chassis. In the chassis, you install module cards, each card having as many as 12 twisted-pair ports. You can install as many cards as the chassis will take. You can get modules that take different types of cabling, depending on your needs. Bridges, Routers, and Switches Bridges and routers are devices used for linking different LANs or LAN segments together. There are many companies that have LANs at various offices across the world. Routers were originally developed to allow connection of remote LANs across a wide area network (WAN). Bridges can also be used for this purpose. By setting up routers or bridges on two different LANs and connecting them together, a user on one LAN can access resources on the other LAN as if they were on the local LAN. There are maximums on distances between workstations and hubs, hubs and hubs, and stations connected to a single LAN. You can exceed these maximums by linking two LAN segments (groups of users/devices) together using a Bridge or Router. Bridges Bridges are simpler and less expensive then routers. Bridges make a simple do/don’t decision on which packets to send across to segments they connect. Filtering is done based on the destination address of the packet. If a packet’s destination is a station on the same segment where it originated, it is not forwarded. If it is destined for a station on another LAN, it is connected to a different
Background image of page 6

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 7
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}