I can think and speak of nothing but the outrages of slaveholders at Kansas and

I can think and speak of nothing but the outrages of

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I can think and speak of nothing but the outrages of slaveholders at Kansas, and the outrages of slaveholders at Washington, ? outrages which, if not met in the spirit of our fathers of the Revolution (and I see no sign that they will be), our liberties are but a name, and our under its successive Principals, has been published by Mrs. Martha Burt Wright of New Haven, giving sketches of Mr. Thayer, his pupils and their teachers. A manuscript biography of Mr. Thayer was prepared by Mr. Franklin V. Rice of Worcester some years since, which awaits publication. 1 Papers relating to John Brown, 87, 88". This content downloaded from 216.213.227.10 on Wed, 18 Sep 2019 16:44:15 UTC All use subject to
1908.] THE EARLY HISTOKY OF KANSAS. 457 Union proves a curse. But, alas ! sir, I see no principle of vitality in what is called freedom in these times. The palsy of death rests on the spirit of freedom in the so-called free States.1 Dr. Howe was resolved that this palsy should give way to action. He had a hand in calling and organizing the Faneuil Hall meeting, which made him chairman of its committee, and he had a part of its funds sent at once to St. Louis for use in Kansas. On July 9 and 10, 1856, he went to the Buffalo Kansas Convention, which appointed the National Kansas Committee, and from Buffalo he hastened to St. Louis, where, July 15, he drew on Mr. Jackson for eight thousand dollars, and then preceded Colonel Higginson and mj'self in a rapid journey through Iowa. From Quincy, in Adams County, Iowa, July 22, he thus wrote to Mr. Jackson: As we approach the River Missouri we begin to get definite infor mation. . . . We have passed two companies of Illinois men beside those enumerated in my last. Lane is concentrating his force about Kenosha, above Nebraska City, and may attempt to force a passage there. It is said here and along the road that Persifor Smith [an army officer] and Missourians are de termined to stop the train of emigration. They will I doubt not demand their arms ; this may be refused and a collision ensue. All accounts from the Territory represent that many free State men are preparing to leave ; they despair of succour and peace. I have a letter which speaks of the effect of the distribution of the $2,000 which we sent on [early]. One man says, " it saved the cause " ; he meant I suppose for a ghort time. I doubt not that the moral effect was great. By all means and by every consideration urge on and multiply the subscriptions, ? every thing depends upon the East. The people of Iowa are in a blaze of indignation, but have no means. They will however go in for Fremont.2 A letter from a member of the commission house of Sim mons and Leadbeater of St. Louis, written from that city June 19, 1856, confirms what Dr. Howe thus writes about the good effect of the early remittance of two thousand dollars from the Faneuil Hall Committee's fund, and gives a contem porary picture of the sufferings, personal and pecuniary, of the free-state residents of Kansas. The writer of this letter i F. B. Sanborn, Life and Letters of John Brown, 249.

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