The net is 155 metres 5 ft 1 inch high at the edges and 1524 metres 5 ft high

The net is 155 metres 5 ft 1 inch high at the edges

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The net is 1.55 metres (5 ft 1 inch) high at the edges and 1.524 metres (5 ft) high in the centre. The net posts are placed over the doubles sidelines, even when singles is played. The minimum height for the ceiling above the court is not mentioned in the Laws of Badminton. Nonetheless, a badminton court will not be suitable if the ceiling is likely to be hit on a high serve. Serving
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The legal bounds of a badminton court during various stages of a rally for singles and doubles games When the server serves, the shuttlecock must pass over the short service line on the opponents' court or it will count as a fault. At the start of the rally, the server and receiver stand in diagonally opposite service courts (see court dimensions ). The server hits the shuttlecock so that it would land in the receiver's service court. This is similar to tennis , except that a badminton serve must be hit below waist height and with the racquet shaft pointing downwards, the shuttlecock is not allowed to bounce and in badminton, the players stand inside their service courts, unlike tennis. When the serving side loses a rally, the server immediately passes to their opponent(s) (this differs from the old system where sometimes the serve passes to the doubles partner for what is known as a "second serve"). In singles, the server stands in their right service court when their score is even, and in her/his left service court when her/his score is odd. In doubles, if the serving side wins a rally, the same player continues to serve, but he/she changes service courts so that she/he serves to a different opponent each time. If the opponents win the rally and their new score is even, the player in the right service court serves; if odd, the player in the left service court serves. The players' service courts are determined by their positions at the start of the previous rally, not by where they were standing at the end of the rally. A consequence of this system is that each time a side regains the service, the server will be the player who did not serve last time. Scoring Main article: Scoring system development of badminton Each game is played to 21 points, with players scoring a point whenever they win a rally regardless of whether they served [13] (this differs from the old system where players could only win a point on their serve and each game was played to 15 points). A match is the best of three games. If the score reaches 20-all, then the game continues until one side gains a two-point lead (such as 24–22), except when there is a tie at 29-all, in which the game goes to a golden point. Whoever scores this point will win. At the start of a match, the shuttlecock is cast and the side towards which the shuttlecock is pointing serves first. Alternatively, a coin may be tossed, with the winners choosing whether to
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serve or receive first, or choosing which end of the court to occupy first, and their opponents making the leftover the remaining choice.
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