At first they were subjected to living in the ghettos

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At first, they were subjected to living in the ghettos and had restricted rights. During the 19th century, Jews had become prominent in both Germany and Austria-Hungary, where they held professions such as lawyers, scientists, scholars, and performers. However, multiple groups felt threatened by the rise of their success, especially German nationalists. Their portrayal of German people as successors of the "Aryan" race put groups such as the Jews on the forefront of political and social assault (Duiker, 2015). Hitler played on these persecutory feelings by transforming this nationalism into a justification for a revolution. This revolution involved the theory of Social Darwinism, where people viewed nations as "races" who competed for survival; therefore, the Aryans were competing with the Jews for the restoration of Germany. The Nazi party targeted Jews by removing them from their positions, removing any teachings by them, and threatening death with persecution and concentration camps (Brower & Sanders, 2014). The "final solution" was established by several Nazi leaders such as SS General Reinhard Heydrich under Hitler's orders; this solution was the establishment of camps and centers where Jews (along with other persecuted groups) were sent to be killed, either by asphyxiation, gas chambers, or shooting (United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, 2006). References: 1. Duiker, W. J. (2015). Contemporary world history. Stamford, CT: Cengage Learning. 2. Browers, D. R., & Sanders, T. (2014). The World in the Twentieth Century (7th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.
3. United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. (2006). "Final Solution": Overview. Retrieved November 20, 2019 from

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