The utilitarian argument is best demonstrated by the case study of the

The utilitarian argument is best demonstrated by the

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The utilitarian argument is best demonstrated by the case study of the biometric security systems employed in airports. With the proof of concept successfullying demonstrating the effectiveness of the facial recognition policy, there remains several important ethical questions regarding the use of facial recognition on a global level. In order for this security system to be effective, every person who has and will ever travel from an airport will be required to submit this biometrics data. For the utilitarian argument, this new change in privacy and sacrifice from the citizens is inconsequential in comparison to the net consequences. By enabling a safer security system to be used that not only eliminates the potential for human error in identification of travelers, but also expedites the security process, the use of facial recognition creates the utilitarian happiness for both the government for a greater sense of security and the traveler who does not require as much time or effort to advance through security checkpoints. A counter-argument to utilitarianism that also rises in the context of facial recognition is that it is difficult to quantify the exact scale of happiness and contentment, such that utilitarianism contains a
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40 subjective element that cannot provide an absolute view of right and wrong. For instance, in the marketing atmosphere, whether or not facial recognition has a significant effect in raising the happiness of the consumers is nearly impossible to gauge. Although companies have been eyeing FRT for its uses in personalized advertising to cut down on costs of ads that may not be reaching their ideal targets, there are concerns that by doing so, these companies will alienate their customers rather than bringing in more business (Hargrave, 2016). In the case of biometric airport security, it can be argued that the utilitarian approach is not thorough enough to examine all possible scenarios, and is in a position to violate Mill’s Freedom Principle. Enacting biometric airport security may make it harder to travel, and in the case of refugees and immigrants, these new policies may cause significant harm by preventing travel despite the need for escape. 4.3 Virtue Ethics Perspective Virtue ethics, otherwise known as rights ethics, places a focus on the characteristic nature of the individual when determining morality rather than putting forth criteria for actions to be considered moral. Studied and made popular by English philosopher John Locke in the seventeenth study, rights- based ethical arguments declare that each individual has claim to natural rights (such as those listed in the Preamble of the United States Constitution. The virtues are pre-determined characteristics such as honesty and courage serve as definitions that guide how each person should live and strive to be. Rights ethics is unique in that the actions and consequences do not matter to determine morality; it is within a person’s inherent nature to be moral rather than being a conscious choice. Furthermore, the rights and
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  • Fall '18
  • Facial recognition system, facial recognition technology

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