The idea of offenders at large can lead to public

This preview shows page 62 - 64 out of 74 pages.

The idea of offenders at large can lead to public unrest and uncertainty as well as draw attention to a state’s inability to accuratelymanage homicide offenders oClearance often assumed to be a measure of police effectiveness oSuffering experienced by families of homicide victims appears to be intensified when the offender is not known oClearance represents the certainty aspect of the deterrence trifecta absence could lead to an increase in crime oDecreasing clearance rates could indicate an alternation in the character of homicide itself oExamining clearance may determine whether application of law is unequally distributed among a society’s citizens Temporal decline isn’t matched by an increase in the homicide rate Regional disparity in homicide clearance in Canada Time and Region oQuebec and British Columbia demonstrated the lowest homicide clearance rates oDecline appears to be steeper in urban vs. rural areas May be attributed to victim and offense characteristics oSilverman and Kennedy speculate gang activity and variations in weapon use are what differentiate British Columbia and Quebec Victim Characteristics oPolice use discretion in clearing homicides based on social characteristics of the victims
oOthers argue, owing to the serious nature of this crime, police expand equal efforts to solve all cases regardless of their possibility of negative evaluation of an undeserving victim oVictims who appear more vulnerable receive more attention from police oTheory of Law (Black): law is unevenly distributed in society oArrest is “more law” than no arrest oCharge is “more law” than no charge, etc. oLaws correspond to stratification, morphology, culture, organization and social control oTenets correspond to structural position, economic position, educational level, community membership, historical contact with mechanisms of formal social controloStratification: vertical distance between members of a society certain individual characteristics can elevate importance Law varies directly with stratification oSome victims socially devalued, individuals will be ignored by police, decreasing clearance probabilities oCanadian stratification would suggest: Less law for female, younger and aboriginal victims because their hierarchy is lower in society oCases showing males and females at the main cases solvedoNo difference in results with respect to victim’s gender or clearance rates oHomicide cases with victims over age of 65 least likely to be solved oChildren seem to receive the most law oVulnerable victims: can be extended to visible minorities White victims receive more law oPolice exert equal effort to all cases irrespective of the status of the victim or the characteristics of the area in which victim lives Offense Characteristics oVictim-offender relationship, population density, certain age-gender victim factors, location of body, weapon used, etc. all influence the probability of clearance o

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture