As a nurse practitioner my plan of care would include extensive education on

As a nurse practitioner my plan of care would include

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As a nurse practitioner my plan of care would include extensive education on prophylaxis with emphasis on hand washing as well as addressing patient specific symptoms after reviewing past medical history and medication list. Frequent hand washing can reduce the spread of respiratory viruses in all ages and can reduce transmission from children to other household members (Arcangelo and Peterson, 2013). References Arcangelo, V. P., & Peterson, A. M. (Eds.). (2013). Pharmacotherapeutics for advanced practice: A practical approach (3rd ed.). Ambler, PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Drugs.com. (2016). Atrovent HFA. Retrieved from Fashner, J., Ericson, K., & Werner, S. (2012). Treatment of the common cold in children and adults. American Family Physician , 86 (2), 153-159. KinyonMunch, K. (2011). What do you tell parents when their child is sick with the common cold?. Journal For Specialists In Pediatric Nursing , 16 (1), 8-15. doi:10.1111/j.1744- 6155.2010.00262.x. Retrieved from Walden Library databases Mayo Clinic. (2016). Common Cold. Retrieved from - conditions/common-cold/symptoms-causes/dxc-20199808
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NURS 6521N-36 Advanced Pharmacology Discussion Post Week 4 – Pharmacotherapy of Respiratory Disorders Cynthia Nwokocha June 19, 2017 Pharmacotherapy for Respiratory Disorders Chronic Bronchitis (CB) is a component of COPD and is the fourth leading cause of death in the United States (Arcangelo & Andrew, 2013). The typical signs of chronic bronchitis are increased dyspnea, increased purulence, productive cough and increased sputum production for 3 months per year for at least 2 years. CB can be contracted by everyone; however, it is seen commonly in those 45 years and older population but also very common in the elderly, and even more so, it is common in men than women (Lung Institute, 2016). Drugs, Treatment, and Risk Factors The goals of drug treatment for CB is to reduce the severity of the chronic symptoms and ameliorate acute exacerbations with prolonged infection free intervals (Arcangelo & Andrew, 2013). Treatment regimen would include bronchodilators, antibiotics, steroids, vaccinations and oxygen therapy. In some instances, surgery or stem cell therapy may be indicated. In addition, pulmonary rehabilitation will be added as it the one of the important components in the treatment of CB. However, the first line of treatment for chronic bronchitis is antimicrobial therapy. This would consist of ampicillin, cephalosporin and fluoroquinolones.
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However, these medications need to administer carefully and the patient needs to be checked and monitored for any hypersensitivity. This can be challenging in an older patient. Older patients can have other existing conditions that can counter act the effects of the drug. For example, fluoroquinolones should be used cautiously in patients with known prolongation of the QT interval, patients with uncorrected hypokalemia, or any one receiving antiarrhythmic agents.
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  • Summer '15
  • Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Common cold, Arcangelo, Upper respiratory tract infection

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