Age of weeks What is a critical period teratogen Critical

Age of weeks what is a critical period teratogen

This preview shows page 15 - 17 out of 23 pages.

Age of viability: 23-25 weeks What is a critical period, teratogen?       Critical period : an optimal period for development of specific physical or cognitive  capabilities o Exposure to certain environmental stimuli or experiences influences development o Impact can be positive or negative o The effects of a teratogenic agent are worst during the critical period when an  organ system grows most rapidly Teratogen:  any disease, drug, or other environmental agent that can harm a developing  fetus o Agents (chemical, viral) that reaches the fetus during prenatal development and  cause harm o Effects of a teratogen depends when exposure occurred: when o Not all embryo/fetuses are affected equally: genetic susceptibility o Higher/longer the exposure, the greater the damage: dose o Different teratogens may cause the same effect: what o The same teratogen may cause different effects, depending on timing: timing of  exposure Drugs: alcohol, FAS, nicotine, cocaine, thalidomide.  Alcohol:  causes overshoot of neuron migration o FAS (fetal alcohol syndrome):  child has the behaviors and facial features o FES (fetal effect syndrome):  child has some behaviors and facial features, but  not all Nicotine:  low birth weight, high risk birth Cocaine:  low birth weight, cognitive deficits Thalidomide:  the child will have missing or flipper arms o Originally taken for nausea 15
Image of page 15
Infectious diseases: rubella, syphilis (know specific effects at specific times), HIV.  Rubella:  german measles o Most dangerous during the first 3 months  (first trimester) o 0-8 weeks (zygote and embryo period): 60% - 80% chance of damage to nervous  system, eyes, and heart o 6-13 weeks: 50% chance of deafness Syphilis:  vaginal disease that occurs in three stages: 1. On vagina 2. In the blood 3.  Effects different organs o Most damaging in the middle to late stages o Blindness, deafness, brain damage, heart problems HIV:  sexual disease o Damaging all throughout pregnancy and can be during and after birth o Transmitted: prenatally through the placenta, during birth, and breast feeding o Body fluids that transmit it: blood, vaginal secretion, semen, breast milk o Signs that the baby has it: compromised immune function Environmental hazards: radiation Stops neuron migration short of where they are supposed to go. Low-birth weight infants, folic acid.  Anoxia, delivery complications, medications, APGAR Low- birth weight babies:  at risk babies. The younger and smaller the baby is a birth,  the lower their chance of survival.  Folic acid:  a lack of this is very bad o Found in: leafy greens, orange juice, enriched grains o Needed for: production, repair, and function of DNA o Without it: neural tube defects, miscarriage, cleft lip, limb defects, heart defects, 
Image of page 16
Image of page 17

You've reached the end of your free preview.

Want to read all 23 pages?

  • Spring '08
  • Michalski

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture