If the board however needs help navigating the topic there is no doubt a

If the board however needs help navigating the topic

This preview shows page 87 - 89 out of 93 pages.

If the board, however, needs help navigating the topic, there is no doubt a virtual long line of security experts, academics, and researchers lining up around the block ready to assist. At least then there's hope the board can strike it third-time lucky in covering the topic.
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The Post cites no evidence — ignore it. Cushing 15 — Tim Cushing, Staff Writer for Techdirt , 2015 (“Washington Post Observes Encryption War 2.0 For Several Months, Learns Absolutely Nothing,” Techdirt , July 20 th , Available Online at - several-months-learns-absolutely-nothing.shtml, Accessed 07-20-2015) Last October -- following Apple and Google's announce of encryption-by-default for iOS and Android devices -- was greeted with law enforcement panic, spearheaded by FBI director James Comey, who has yet to find the perfect dead child to force these companies' hands. The Washington Post editorial board found Comey's diatribes super- effective! It published a post calling for some sort of law enforcement- only, magical hole in Apple and Google's encryption . How to resolve this? A police “back door” for all smartphones is undesirable — a back door can and will be exploited by bad guys, too. However, with all their wizardry, perhaps Apple and Google could invent a kind of secure golden key they would retain and use only when a court has approved a search warrant. Ultimately, Congress could act and force the issue, but we’d rather see it resolved in law enforcement collaboration with the manufacturers and in a way that protects all three of the forces at work: technology, privacy and rule of law. When is a "back door" not a "back door?" Well, apparently when an editorial board spells it G-O-L-D-E-N K-E-Y. It's the same thing, but in this particular pitch, it magically isn't , because good intentions. Or something . Months later, the debate is still raging. But it's boiled down to two arguments: 1. This is impossible. You can't create a "law enforcement only" backdoor in encryption. It's simply not possible because a backdoor is a backdoor and can be used by anyone who can locate the door handle . 2. No, it isn't. Please see below for citations and references: [the article includes several paragraph breaks to indicate that there are, in fact, no citations or references] The FBI is at an impasse. Comey firmly believes this is possible , despite openly admitting he has zero evidence to back this claim up. When asked for specifics, Comey defers to "smart tech guys" and their warlock-like skills . Sensing James Comey might be struggling a bit, the editorial board of the Washington Post is once again riding to the rescue. And they've brought the same level of cluelessness with them . (h/t to Techdirt reader Steve R.) Mr. Comey’s assertions should be taken seriously. A rule-of-law society cannot allow sanctuary for those who wreak harm. But there are legitimate and valid counter arguments from software engineers, privacy advocates and companies that make the smartphones and software. They say that any decision to give law enforcement a key — known as “exceptional access” — would
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