Moving into neighbourhoods searching through homes

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Moving into neighbourhoods, searching through homes looking for guns at nd drugs mass arrests Short term positive influence, making Long term influence - destroys relationship between community and police Homeless Youth and Self-Identity - Oct. 10 Early Research 100 years age: street urchins (linked to JDA) Issue not on radar until late 1970s early 1980s Prior to this, homeless people were discussed as "tramps, hobos" to describe men who were homeless Homeless population regarded as men who couldn't find work, alcoholics Told to leave home Would stay with relatives or friends, wouldn't really be on the streets until the 80s Services (homeless shelter, food banks, etc.) weren't available until now Drew attention: runaways and throwaways Badgley Report (1986) on sexual exploitation of Canadian children Looked at sexual exploitation of young children across the country Street workers were homeless Staying with "boyfriends" or in shelters Hagan and McCarthy (Mean streets) Looked at the crime the young people were involved in Self-report surveys: went to youth shelter and drop ins and would bring questionnaires to hand out to young people. Were given some sort of incentive for completing the survey (meal card, voucher) Had a number of criminological theories they looked at: strain - Robert Agnew, control - if the young people had weak social bonds, whether or not they were
attached to adults, had a conventional belief system/activities, were they committed to achieving success in their life They found that these homeless services were usually accessed 70% male, 30% female Because the streets are not safe places, especially for young women. So they don't sleep "rough" like young men do. If women do, they only do if another man is present. This is why they sleep at "boyfriends" Accommodation sex: prostituting in exchange for sleeping in someone's house If you are under 16 you cannot go to a homeless shelter because you are a minor and under the control of the CPS Focus on explaining crime among street youth Is it due to their backgrounds (strain and control) Is it due to the situational adversity they face? Findings reveal that familial and school factors have minimal influence on current criminal behaviour Instead, criminal behaviour is influenced by such immediate factors as lack of stable housing, drug and alcohol use, and criminal peers who engage in illegal activities Kids on the street are those who are facing more pressing adversity Sleeping rough (squats, tents, fields, under bridges), more likely to be involved in drug use Alcohol and drug use and dealing drugs - if you are using drugs you need to make money to support your addiction. The most ready way to do that is to engage in crime and deal drugs Stealing food and clothes because they didn't have either and needed it. Things to survive and things to get by Criminal behaviour is also influenced by a lack of income, job experiences, and perceptions of a blocked opportunity structure

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