American Indians and Alaskan Natives received worse care than Whites for one

American indians and alaskan natives received worse

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American Indians and Alaskan Natives received worse care than Whites for one-third of quality measures. Poor people received worse care than high-income people for about 60% of quality measures. In 2011, 37.6% of poor Americans reported barriers that restricted their access to care. Blacks had more maternal deaths per 100,000 live births, and had a greater incidence of postoperative pulmonary embolism (PE) or deep vein thrombosis (DVT) per 1000 surgical admissions compared to Whites. Asians had a greater incidence of live-born low birth weight infants than Whites. Low-income (poor) people had a greater number of admissions with diabetes with short- term complications per 100,00 population than High-income people. At the same time, there was improvement in many areas of existing health disparities. For example: There was a decrease in new AIDS cases and HIV infection deaths per 100,000 population in Black compared with White. There was a decrease in new AIDS cases and HIV infection deaths per 100,000 population in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic White. There was a decrease in admissions for uncontrolled diabetes without complications per 100,000 population in Black compared with White. There was a decrease in admissions for uncontrolled diabetes without complications per 100,000 population in Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic White. Health Promotion Activities Health promotion organizations, wellness centers, and traditional healthcare centers all offer a different approach to client care. Table 7–2 demonstrates
these differences. Health promotion activities can be carried out either on a governmental level (e.g., a national or state program to improve knowledge of nutrition) or on a personal level (e.g., an individual exercise program). Table 7–2 Comparison of Three Foci of Health Care: Traditional, Health Promotion, and Wellness Traditional Health Promotion Wellness Primary goal Diagnosis and cure Illness/injury prevention and risk reduction Improved overall health and wellness Focus of care Disease/injury Individuals, families, and communities Individuals, families, and communities Interventi on Medical/surgical/ment al health treatment Health risk appraisal, health - information, strategies for behavior change Health information, nutritional - counseling, exercise/fitness, stress management, risk avoidance Duration Until problem is resolved Length of program Lifelong Location Hospitals, clinics, MD/ANP offices Schools, workplaces, gyms/fitness centers, community centers, hospitals, clinics, MD/ANP offices Schools, workplaces, libraries, gyms/- fitness centers, community centers, grocery stores, hospitals, clinics, MD/ANP offices Example Treatment of client Health risk appraisal Programs to prevent
Traditional Health Promotion Wellness with acute myocardial infarction for client with family history of heart disease and coaching for lifestyle change (e.g., smoking cessation, weight management, diet, exercise) obesity in childhood including developing lifelong nutrition and exercise habits Health promotion programs on an individual level can be active or passive.

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