a Measure the exact volume of water added by reading from the lowest point of

A measure the exact volume of water added by reading

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a. Measure the exact volume of water added by reading from the lowest point of the meniscus. b. If a 25.00 mL graduated cylinder is unavailable, add 25.0 mL to a 50.0 mL graduated cylinder. 3) Place graduated cylinder onto an analytical balance. a. Once a stable mass is displayed, tare the balance (or set to zero). 4) Carefully, place enough mass of the first metal into the graduated cylinder to produce a volume displacement of approximately 1–2 milliliters. a. Record the mass (or cumulative mass) of the metal, the total volume, and the cumulative volume of water displaced. b. Be careful not to splash out any of the water. 5) Without removing the previous mass, add enough metal to produce another volume displacement of approximately 1–2 milliliters. a. Record the mass (or cumulative mass) of the metal, the total volume, and the cumulative volume of water displaced. 6) Continue adding mass of the metal using the same procedure for 3 additional data points. a. Record the mass (or cumulative mass) of the metal, the total volume, and the cumulative volume of water displaced. 7) Repeat the above experiment with the other three metals. 8)Produce a graph of the cumulative mass versus the cumulative volume displaced using a computerized graphing program. Experiment #1 Barnett
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8 a.Compare the experimental/observed density to the true/theoretical densityand calculate a percent error.b.Percent error = [(true value – experimental value)/true value] * 100%i.Percent error cannot be a negative value. Take the absolute valueof the number if necessary.c.For the true/theoretical density, cite references for sources using properbibliographic technique. Waste Disposal and Lab Clean–Up : 1) Without allowing any of the metal fragments to fall into the drain, dispose of the water down the sink. 2) Place wet metal fragments into the appropriately labeled waste containers for drying. 3) Stoppers should be dried off and returned to their storage bins. The LabWrite–Up : 1) In the conclusion, briefly discuss all experimental/observed densities and compare to true values. 2) Following this comparison with the true values, and considering the percent error, discuss reasons for error and how these errors affected results. 3) Which metal is the densest and which is the least dense? 4) Define intensive properties and extensive properties. Provide a few examples for each, including those used in this experiment. 5) Would your density results have been the same if ethanol was used as the liquid in the graduated cylinder? Explain. Experiment #1 Barnett
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9 Example Data Table : Table A: Mass and Volume Measurements for Titanium Metal Cumulative Mass of Metal (g) (y –axis on graph) Total Volume in Graduated Cylinder (mL) Cumulative Volume Displaced (mL) (x –axis on graph) 0.000 15.00 0.00 5.228 16.45 1.45 10.162 17.80 2.80 12.991 18.40 3.40 14.892 18.95 3.95 21.205 19.80 4.80 Draw the best fit straight line and the density will be the slope of the graph: Δy/Δx. Data Tables : Mass and Volume Measurements for Rubber Stoppers Cumulative Mass of Stoppers (g) (y –axis on graph) Total Volume in Cylinder (mL) Cumulative Volume Displaced (mL) (x –axis on graph) 0.00 or 0.000 0.0
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  • Spring '19
  • Chemistry, Chemical reaction, Timothy Barnett

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