Being socially responsible means an organization

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Being socially responsible means an organization shows concern for the people and environment in which it transacts business. It also means that these values are communicated and enforced by everyone in the organization and, in some cases, with business patners, such as those who sell products to the company (e.g., supplier of raw material for product production) and those who help the company distribute and sell to other customers (e.g., retail stores). In addition to insuring these values exist within the organization and its business partners, social responsibility may also manifest itself in the suppot of social causes that help society. For instance, marketers may sponsor chaity events or produce cause-related advetising. Marketers who are pursuing a socially responsible agenda should bear in mind that such efforts do not automatically translate into increased revenue or even an improved public image. However, organizations that consistently exhibit socially responsible tendencies may eventually gain a strong reputation that could pay dividends in the form of increased customer loyalty. Shortly discuss the rights of consumerism. Ans : John F. Kennedy had equated the rights of the ordinary American consumer with national interest. He gave the American consumer four basic rights: The Right to Safety - to be protected against the marketing of goods which are hazardous to health or life. The Right to Choose - to be assured, wherever possible, access to a variety of products and services at competitive pieces: and in those industries where competition is not workable and Government regulation is substituted, an assurance of satisfactory quality and service at fair picas. The Right to Information - to be protected against fraudulent, deceitful or grossly misleading information, advertising, labeling, or other practices, and to be given the facts s/he needs to make an informed choice. The Right to be Heard - to be assured that consumer interests will receive full and sympathetic consideration in the formulation of Government policy, and fair and expeditious treatment in its administrative tribunals.' Kennedy recognized that consumers are the largest economic group in the country's economy, affecting and affected by almost every public and private economic decision. But they were also the only important group who were not effectively organized, whose views were not heard. Therefore, the Federal Government, by nature the highest spokesman for all people, had a special obligation to the consumer's needs. Thirteen years later President Gerald Ford felt that the four rights constituted in Kennedy's Bill of Rights were inadequate for a situation where most consumers are not educated enough to make the right choices. So he added the Right to Consumer Education, as an informed consumer cannot be exploited easily.

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