What did I know what did I know of loves austere and lonely offices The diction

What did i know what did i know of loves austere and

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What did I know, what did I know of love's austere and lonely offices? The diction in the last stanza is a lot more calm and relaxed compared to the first two stanzas, as conveyed in the meaning of the final stanza (a sense of love/remembrance) Conclusions “Those Winter Sundays” is about an adult who is looking back at his past relationship with his father. He now recognizes the extremity to which his father did things for him even within the angry household. The speaker regrets not recognizing the habitual actions that his father did for him while he was young. The title is significant in that it describes the typical winter Sundays that the speaker’s father would do things for him and how, in his youth, he never appreciated any of it. Bibliography Hayden, Robert. “Those Winter Sundays.” The Compact Bedford Anthology of Literature . Ed. Michael Meyer. 8th ed. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin’s, 2009. 571. Print. Kennedy, X.J. and Dana Gioia. “Culture, Race, and Ethnicity." Literature: An Introduction to Fiction, Poetry, Drama, and Writing. Boston: Pearson Longman, 2007. 640. Print. “Robert Hayden.” Poets.Org . Academy of American Poets. 16 Apr. 2008. Web. Let’s try analyzing some other poems: 1. Margaret Atwood’s “You fit into me” (p. 228; consider tone, diction, repetition, imagery, and irony) 2. William Hathaway’s “Oh, Oh” (handout; consider tone, diction, imagery, and irony) 3. Randall Jarrell’s “The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner” (p. 219; consider metaphor, diction, connotation, and ironic tone) 4. Gwendolyn Brooks’ “We Real Cool” (p. 236; consider diction, irony, rhyme, and tone) 5. Edwin Arlington Robinson’s “Richard Cory” (p. 216; consider irony, rhyme, rhythm, meter) 6. Katharyn Howd Machan’s “Hazel Tells LaVerne” (handout; consider diction, irony, and allusion) 7. William Carlos Williams’ “This Is Just to Say” (p. 223; consider image, diction, rhythm) 8. e.e. cummings’ “she being Brand” (handout; consider metaphor, imagery, diction, syntax, rhythm, and the odd capitalization, line breaks, and spacing)
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