Arteries The anterior and posterior Circumflex Humeral Arteries arise as small

Arteries the anterior and posterior circumflex

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Arteries The anterior and posterior Circumflex Humeral Arteries arise as small branches from the axillary artery. Circumflex humeral arteries course around the surgical neck of the humerus and provide blood supply around the shoulder joint.
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Brachial Artery As the axillary arteries reach the inferior border of the teres major muscle, their name changes to the Brachial Arteries which course distally along the medial side of the arm.
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Profunda Brachii Artery The Profunda Brachii Artery arises as a large branch from the brachial artery and courses posterior to the humerus. It courses distally along the posterior surface of the arm between the medial and lateral heads of triceps brachii and supplies the posterior tissues of the arm.
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Radial and Ulnar Arteries The brachial artery terminates anterior to the elbow by bifurcating into the Radial Artery and Ulnar Artery. The RADIAL ARTERY courses distally along the lateral surface of the forearm. The ULNAR ARTERY courses distally along the medial surface of the forearm.
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Ulnar Artery The ulnar artery courses anterior to the wrist and terminates in the palm of the hand by forming the SUPERFICIAL PALMAR ARCH . Remember to think USA! The U lnar Artery forms the S uperficial A rch
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Radial Artery The radial artery courses posterior to the thumb by passing through the anatomical snuff box” and then courses into the palm of the hand.
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Radial Artery The radial artery terminates in the palm of the hand by forming the DEEP PALMAR ARCH . (R.D.A.): The R adial artery forms the D eep A rch. Both superficial and deep arches give off digital arteries which supply the fingers.
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Abdominal Arteries
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Abdominal Arteries Descending Aorta Celiac Trunk - Left Gastric a. - Splenic a. - Common Hepatic a. - Right Hepatic a. - Left Hepatic a. Superior Mesenteric a. Adrenal a. Renal a. Gonadal a. Inferior Mesenteric a. Common Iliac a. External Iliac a. Internal Iliac a.
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Abdominal Arteries Descending Aorta Celiac Trunk Renal a. Left Gastric a. Splenic a. Gonadal a. Common Hepatic a. Common Iliac a. Internal Iliac a. External Iliac a. Superior Mesenteric a. Inferior Mesenteric a.
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Descending (Abdominal) Aorta The DESCENDING (ABDOMINAL) AORTA enters the abdomen by traversing the aortic hiatus of the diaphragm at the level of the 12 th thoracic vertebrae (T12). The descending aorta gives off many branches that supply the organs and viscera of the abdomen before terminating at the level of the 4 th lumbar vertebrae (L4).
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Celiac Trunk The CELIAC TRUNK is a short vessel that arises from the aorta immediately below the aortic opening of the diaphragm. It is embedded within the dense meshwork of nerves that constitute the CELIAC PLEXUS. The celiac trunk gives off the following branches: Left gastric artery Splenic artery Common Hepatic artery
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Celiac Trunk Branches from the celiac trunk supply the tissues of the: Liver Gal bladder Spleen Pancreas Stomach Duodenum (first portion of the small intestine)
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Superior Mesenteric Artery The Superior Messenteric Artery arises from the aorta just below the celiac trunk.
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  • Winter '13
  • MaryE.Craig
  • Common carotid artery, Subclavian artery, Arteries of the head and neck, Internal jugular vein, external carotid artery, posterior tibial artery

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