the year 1440 when Portuguese discoverers introduced the first nautical charts

The year 1440 when portuguese discoverers introduced

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 8 pages.

the year 1440, when Portuguese discoverers introduced the first nautical charts, marked a turning point in the striation of the sea. Maps with meridians, parallels, longitudes, latitudes and territories gridded the oceans, making distances calculable and measurable. It meant the beginning of the great explorations – and of the transatlantic slave trade and the expansion of the European State apparatus. The smooth and the striated concern the political and politics. While the smooth and the striated are not of the same nature and de jure oppositional, Deleuze and Guattari indicate that de facto they only exist in complex mixed forms . Moreover, the smooth and the striated work in different domains. If the sea is the spatial field par excellence that brings out smoothness and striation, art is perhaps the domain that can give the most varied and subtle expression of the complex dynamics between them. The present collection investigates the smooth and the striated in the broad field of artistic production. It was instigated by the Third International Deleuze Studies Conference in Amsterdam (2010) that focused on the connections between art, science and philosophy. Along with conference papers, the role of art was explored through the work of participating artists and in a curated exhibition, The Smooth and the Striated. This exhibition focused on the constant interplay
Image of page 1
between delineating and opening forces in the works of the eight participating contemporary artists. Together, the installations, videos, drawings and photographs spurred a wealth of new connections and ideas in relation to the concepts of smoothness and striation: the artworks touched upon the solidification of historical memory and the transformation of ever growing archival material; the striation of subterranean city space; the politics of vast demographic datasets; the visualisation of scientific patents; and more.1 Similar to the exhibited artists in the context of the Deleuze Studies Conference, the authors in this volume think with art to shed new and interdisciplinary light upon the concepts of smoothness and striation, and, conversely, upon the way the smooth and the striated can give important insights into artistic practices. The smooth and the striated directly address processes in (social, political, geographical, biological) life, taken up in philosophy and art. Most of the contributions in this volume discuss the concepts of the smooth and the striated in relation to specific artworks that, in Claire Colebrook’s words, ‘are not representations of images of life’, but, if we consider the emergence of the genesis of art and philosophy, can be understood as ‘something of life’s creative potential’ (Colebrook 2006: 30). Hence, the singular artworks or artistic practices are not to be taken as illustrations of the concepts but as singular ways of embodying or expressing the
Image of page 2
Image of page 3

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture