Perhaps these tensions may be explained by rousseaus

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Perhaps these tensions may be explained by Rousseau's vision of the human as a complex being oriented to conflicting goods: the goods of the body and of the soul, of the community and the individual, of life and truth, and, moreover, of the good of the few, theoretical pursuits, and the good of all others, practical pursuits, of theory and practice. The least one can conclude is that perhaps Rousseau took his stand as a middle-man, as the in-between being, as philosopher also concerned with the happiness of humankind, and, as such, forged his own place among the future teachers of the human race. Certainly many of the questions he raised have subsequently become themes in on-going discussions of science, technology, and ethics, even when they are not always explicitly referenced to Rousseau. Discourse on Inequality JEAN-JACQUES ROUSSEAU Sparknotes Introduction Rousseau's Discourse on Inequality is one of the most powerful critiques of modernity ever written. It attempts to trace the psychological and political effects of modern society on human nature, and to show how these effects were produced. In order to do this, Rousseau demonstrates that human evolution and the development of inequality between men are closely related. The result is both a sweeping explanation of how modern man was created, and a sharp criticism of unequal modern political institutions. In the Discourse, Rousseau diagnoses the problem with modern political institutions that he later attempted to resolve in the Social Contract. The Discourse was originally written as an entry for an essay competition run by the Dijon academy of Arts and Sciences in 1754. The essay question was "What is the origin of inequality among men, and is it authorized by the natural law?" Rousseau had won the competition in 1750 with his First Discourse (on the Arts and Sciences). He failed to win a prize with this second discourse, but its publication brought him widespread praise, and an important place in history of philosophy. The Discourse on Inequality is a powerful, passionate argument, which is dazzlingly written and broad in scope. Its methodology is brilliant and daring. Rousseau attempts to trace man back to his natural state, discarding the authority of the biblical account. At heart, though, the Discourse is a daring guess, an exercise in conjecture and
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reconstruction. Although the Discourse is closely related to eighteenth-century debates about the nature of man, and about different forms of government, it also has a wider significance. It is important because Rousseau asks questions about who we are and what we want—questions that still apply today. Rousseau's central idea, that modern people exist within an ever-increasing system of needs in which the opinion of others is vitally important, is hugely influential. Traces of it can be found in Hegel's idea of civil society, and in Marx's description of the alienated worker.
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